Current Projects

Seattle Parks and Recreation values the community's commitment and support to our parks and green spaces. One of our goals is to actively engage and build relationships with Seattle's diverse population. From this page, we invite you to explore information on how to get involved with Parks and to learn the best way to provide input or participate in public processes.

Seattle Parks and Recreation is funded through the Seattle Park District, general funds, previous levies, City programs such as Your Voice, Your Choice and our supporting non-profits. Learn more about our funding sources and how we get financing for projects.
The 2016 Community Center Strategic plan named eight community centers for major maintenance projects focused on extending the life of these facilities and increasing programming potential. The eight centers are listed below. Each link brings you to more information about that center's project.
In coordination with a new funding partner, Seattle Parks and Recreation is excited to proceed with a second round of four additional outdoor exercise equipment locations. The installations are incorporated into capital improvement projects with construction scheduled to be completed between winter 2017 and spring 2019.
This project will develop this space acquired by Seattle Parks and Recreation in 2014. The design will incorporate accessibility in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) as well as the intent to develop green space in identified gaps throughout the city. Use is restricted to low impact, passive recreation and impervious surfacing shall be limited to 15% or less.
This Seattle Park District project was funded to provide the community access to open space within high density urban areas across the city.
The project will include replacement of field lighting with a new energy efficient lighting system. The replacement of the old and aging wooden poles has been prioritized as a health and safety project for the community.
Create a schematic design for improvements at Be'er Sheva Park. Possible improvements to the park's lakeside end of the S. Henderson Street corridor include greater shoreline access, walkways, and art installations. The Rainier Beach Link2Lake Open Space Steering Committee has hired a landscape architect to facilitate the community engagement process, develop the schematic design and investigate feasibility and permitting requirements.
This play area project will replace the play equipment and provide seating. This includes replacing the drinking fountain and accessibility improvements in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
The new lighting system will reduce light spill into the neighborhood and night skies. It will also be more energy efficient and provide safe, uniform lighting levels for the users. Existing poles and fixtures will be demolished. New poles, fixtures and electrical control equipment will be installed.
This project will replace the play area equipment and renovate the existing comfort station (restroom) with the goal of bringing these amenities up to current safety and accessibility standards. Accessibility for all is a value of Seattle Parks and Recreation. In addition, the project will make other site accessibility improvements that meet the standards from the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
The purpose of this project is to renovate the playground at Burke-Gilman Playground Park into a play space that specializes in nature-based play for children of all abilities.
Repair trail at prioritized sites as determined by 2015 condition assessment currently under way in collaboration with Seattle Department of Transportation.
2020 Cal Anderson Park is a project of Seattle Parks & Recreation to engage the public on how changing assumptions and language can affect the design of park spaces and create a sense of belonging for everyone.
The current development project will add much needed public green space to the busy Madison corridor, link the Central District and Capitol Hill, represent the community through design and the namesake history and beautify what is currently an empty lot.
The Cheasty Mountain Bike and Pedestrian Trail Pilot Project will provide recreational opportunities for families and neighbors to access nature through our urban park greenspaces. The project site is an urban greenspace that has been heavily logged and is overgrown with invasive species. Work is underway by the Green Seattle Partnership to restore the area. The trail is designed to work in harmony with this restoration effort.
The City Hall Park area is a collection of public spaces in Pioneer Square, including City Hall Park (downtown Seattle’s second largest green space), Prefontaine Place (a key entrance to the Sound Transit Pioneer Square light rail station), and portion of 3rd Avenue.
The Colman Vegetation Management Plan is the result of an ongoing collaboration between Seattle Parks and Recreation, Green Seattle Partnership (GSP) and the community. The goal is to adopt a VMP that will help guide future restoration work that is consistent with best practices and aligns with current city initiatives.
In 2015, the King County Wastewater Treatment Division finished the upgrade to the Barton Pump Station, next to the Fauntleroy Ferry Terminal, to accommodate West Seattle's growing population. As part of the construction of the new pump station, King County acquired the property just to the north of SW Barton Street, which was used as their temporary construction offices. Now that the project is finished, King County no longer needs the property and is proposing to trade it to the City in exchange for the vacation of the portion of the SW Barton Street right-of-way where the pump station is constructed.
This project replaces existing play equipment with equipment that is accessible to children of all abilities. Additionally, site accessibility improvements that meet the standards from the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) will be made.
Seattle Parks and Recreation is proposing to make ADA improvements at the Environmental Learning Center. This project corrects approximately 160 documented barriers to accessibility on the Seattle Barrier Removal Schedule.
The Preventative Tree Maintenance crew will begin preventative tree work at Discovery Park in February 2018. This work is part of our Preventative Tree Maintenance Program, which aims to reduce risk related to trees and improve the long-term health of trees throughout our parks system.
One of the Seattle Park District Maintaining Parks and Facilities funding initiatives is Improving Dog Off Leash Areas. This initiative will improve existing off-leash areas through increased maintenance and updates to aging infrastructure.
Recent public planning through the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition's Healthy Communities program (2013) and Seattle Parks Foundation's South Park Green Spaces Vision Plan (2014) have identified Duwamish Waterway Park as a key open space in the community in need of improvement. There is a strong interest from the community to create more amenities to draw people to the park.
This project will replace the play equipment and make accessibility improvements to the south play area built in 1996.
The Washington State Convention Center Expansion Project is providing $10 million in funding to repair, restore and enhance Freeway Park. This funding is part of the public benefit package associated with the Convention Center expansion. These improvements at Freeway Park will be based on the Finding Freeway Park concept plan which identifies areas of focus, and on community input.
The scope of this project brings the play area into compliance with current play area safety standards and guideline efforts of the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) as well as meets the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
This project will renovate the play area equipment and replace the existing comfort station (restroom) structure to meet current safety and accessibility standards.
Seattle Parks and Recreation is working with other City departments to build a new off-leash area at the Georgetown Flume site.
This project will replace the aging synthetic turf at Georgetown Playfield with a new state-of-the-art synthetic turf system. This will include the removal of the old 'worn out' synthetic turf and address any structural repairs to curbing, sub-subsurface, and drainage.
These repairs include a crucial roof repair and replacement of the pool pump which will lengthen the life of this facility. SPR is still aware that a longer-term plan for the recreation needs of Green Lake and surrounding neighborhoods will need to be addressed as this facility continues to age.
In 2017, with funding from the Major Projects Challenge Fund and in partnership with the Rowing Advisory Council, Seattle Parks and Recreation hired Schact Aslani Architects to undertake a pre-design feasibility study to look at options for improving the Small Craft Center. The study is complete and the project is currently funded through the first phase of design.
This initiative will further develop the partnership between Seattle Parks and Recreation and Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) to enhance and activate connection points from Neighborhood Greenways to parks, with parks-oriented expertise. Greenways are a key component of the 2014 Seattle Bicycle Master Plan, comprising 250 miles or 41% of the total proposed network. These corridors enhance safe, calm residential streets designed to give bicycle and pedestrian travel priority. They provide people of all ages and abilities with comfortable and attractive places to walk and ride.
This project relocates the play area from the north end of the park to the grass area just south of the wading pool closer to the community center. This includes providing new play equipment and improved visibility and access at the new play area and restoring the site of the old play area.
Renovation of existing park and development of park on land acquired with 2000 Pro Parks Levy.
This project will develop a play area within the existing Hubbard Homestead Park. The goal is to provide playground equipment which will include play elements and access for children of all ages and abilities. Improvements will include fall surfacing, seating, storm water mitigation and limited landscape improvements.
The renovation planned for Jefferson Golf Course holes will reduce golf balls travelling out of the park and into the adjacent streets and homes. The renovation changes the traffic pattern for holes #11-13 from a counter-clockwise pattern to a clockwise pattern which will have a higher percentage of balls remaining on the course and in play.
The 2012 Kubota Garden Strategic Plan Update, approved by Seattle Parks and Recreation, identifies the need to complete the enclosure of the garden. This would better secure and protect the garden and help to accommodate the over 65,000 visitors annually to the garden.
This project will make needed playground and playfield renovations, including new play equipment, new ballfield grass turf, irrigation and drainage renovation, basketball court resurfacing, replacement of tennis court with new pickleball courts, retaining wall replacement, and access improvements to meet Americans with Disabilities (ADA) standards and accessibility improvements to the comfort station.
This project will update the play area with new play equipment that meets current safety standards. The new equipment will improve access to the play area in conformance with the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards.
Seattle Parks and Recreation is partnering with Seattle Public Utilities and the non-profit Mid Sound Fisheries Enhancement Group to develop a floodplain reconnection project benefiting water quality, in-stream, and riparian habitat, managing on-site stormwater, and creating an accessible natural area for the Lake City community, a heavily urbanized and underserved area.
The Parks and Green Spaces Levy provides $24 million for the acquisition of neighborhood parks in up to 20 identified areas throughout the City. The Lake City Residential Urban Village was included in that list.
This improvement project is funded by the Seattle Park District. The play area renovation will update play equipment with play structures accessible to children of all ages and abilities. Additionally, accessibility improvements that meet the standards from the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) will be made throughout the play area.
Seattle Parks and Recreation purchased this .27 acre site in 2013 to provide the community access to open space within this high density urban area. The Seattle Park District funds the development of this parcel into a park. Seattle Parks and Recreation will work with the community to develop a design for the park.
This project will remove the remainder of the failing seawall and continue shoreline restoration work that began when the south half of the seawall failed in the mid-1990’s.
At Lowman Beach Park, the existing court will be removed as part of the Shoreline Restoration and Seawall Replacement project. The community has come together to explore options to install a racket court because the existing one needs to be removed as part of the seawall restoration project.
This play area renovation will update play equipment with play structures accessible to children of all abilities, ages 2-5 and 5-12. Additionally, the project will enhance safety and improve play area accessibility in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
This project will renovate and enhance the beach play area to engage children in natural play with sand, water, driftwood, rocks and vegetation. Additionally, the project will enhance safety and improve play area accessibility in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
Since the early 1990s several master plans were developed for the park and surplus navy properties. However, none of these plans took a comprehensive look at the roads, streets, paths and how people entered and moved around the park. SPR is in the process of studying and making suggested improvements for park circulation, comfort stations, and signage/wayfinding.
This project will build out the south wing of Building 47 to allow greater programming capacity for Magnuson Community Center. It will also make accessibility improvements to the parking, entry and lobby of the community center.
This renovation project includes improvements to the athletic playfields, play area, and improves accessible routes of travel to the restroom, field dugouts, play area, and parking lot in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards. The project details include new equipment for the play area; new drainage, irrigation, grass playing surface, and backstops for the playfields; ADA access to parking, comfort station, and play area.
This project will develop the park, which includes the Marra Farm, Seattle's largest site for urban gardening, in accordance with the Long Range Development Plan.
In 2014, Seattle Parks and Recreation purchased the .28-acre property at 6311 California Ave SW, north of Morgan Junction Park, to expand the park and provide additional open space for this high-density neighborhood. The design will incorporate accessibility in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and additional park elements will be incorporated after gathering public input. We anticipate construction and completion by the end of 2020.
A number of projects will be completed throughout Mount Baker Park.
This Seattle Park District project will create a new neighborhood park. It was funded to provide the community access to open space within this high density urban neighborhood.
The Carving House will provide insight into distinctive varieties of Native American culture and be a place where Native carvers are safe and the public is welcome. The Shed will include a living roof and the beach will have a carved Welcome Figure.
Occidental Square has been transformed into the lively heart of the Pioneer Square neighborhood, with colorful café seating, new planters, artwork, ping-pong tables and musical performances. The park's newfound popularity and high attendance at regular free events has inspired donors to invest in two major capital projects. One project is a graceful new wood and glass pavilion at the south end of the square. The structure, which will replace an existing outdated kiosk, will serve as a visitor center, performance stage, and well-lit shelter in inclement weather. The second project is a new play area at the north end of the square, with climbing equipment, safety surfacing, and an attractive steel and timber bench where people can sit and enjoy the park and watch their children play.
Seattle Parks and Recreation's Olmsted Parks and Boulevards Restoration project will provide restoration projects in 10 different Olmsted parks or boulevards around the city. A study conducted in 2018 looked at 10 different sites to assess existing conditions, research historical design intent and determine restoration feasibility. The restoration projects begin in 2020 and are prioritized based upon community feedback and funding availability.
This project repairs and replaces the surface at the water play feature, installs a recirculating system and performs other related improvements to the water park. The focus is to improve water conservation, safety and water play value at this location. The project also replaces the existing damaged comfort station with a new code compliant building and installs adult fitness equipment.
In response to requests for inspection and recent tree failures, Seattle Parks and Recreation's Urban Forestry Unit has identified twenty-five trees that necessitate removal along Queen Anne Boulevard. Many have died or become structurally unsound due to decay organisms, and need to be addressed immediately. These trees are creating a hazard for park users or adjacent property owners. Only trees that are untenable to retain are being recommended for removal.
This program is intended to satisfy the Park District Investment Initiative 2.6: Fund the renewal of existing P-Patch gardens, update aging garden infrastructure, increase accessibility, and expand essential services. This initiative fosters community building and recognizes both the importance of P-Patches as community spaces and the support needed to sustain them for everyone, including underserved and underrepresented communities. $85,000 is provided for the plan and $200,000 is provided each year for construction.
The goal of this project is to renovate the existing play area space, including new play equipment, ADA improvements, benches, and seating options. Renovated elements will meet current safety and accessibility standards. Please take our survey!
Replace the failing direct burial primary electrical service with a new service installed as an underground raceway system. The new "raceway" system has underground pipes ("conduit") connecting to a series of concrete boxes ("vaults"). This "raceway" system allows access for repairs and meets the current code requirements for Seattle City Light.
The Friends of Seward Park and community supporters will work with a consultant team to lead a community engagement process to create a new torii gate to replace the one that stood at the entrance to Seward Park fifty years prior to its removal in 1986.
During the public process led by the Friends of Smith Cove Park (FoSCP) in 2015, beach volleyball was also highlighted as a potential active recreational use on this parcel. Current improvements may be limited to drainage and irrigation infrastructure to make the current field more playable. However, the long term vision is that the field be improved so that it is playable year-round and available for a variety of youth and adult sports.
This project includes installation of synthetic field surfacing, lighting, ADA access and site improvements for the lower playfield. Seattle Parks and Recreation is investing in state-of-the-art synthetic turf systems that are safe, playable and durable. Additionally, we are investing in the highest quality energy-efficient field lighting which minimizes spill light and glare off the field while providing performance recreational light. The project will improve the accessibility to the field in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
This project addresses safety and accessibility of the play area by upgrading play area surfacing and improving accessibility as feasible. The existing play structures are due for replacement. The improvements will include in-kind replacement of existing play structures.
To better serve a diverse and rapidly growing community, Seattle Parks and Recreation will open a new community center in the South Lake Union neighborhood that we are currently calling the South Lake Union Community Center. It will be a private-public partnership project as the Community Center will be located within a private development project but operated by Seattle Parks and Recreation.
This Seattle Park District project will replace playground equipment which will include play elements and access for children of all ages and abilities.
Seattle Parks and Recreation purchased this .83 acre site in 2014 to provide the South Park community access to open space within this high density urban area. The Seattle Park District funds the development of this parcel into a park. Seattle Parks and Recreation will work with the community to develop a design for the park. Please participate in the public process as we work together to design your park spaces.
The goal of this project is to renovate the existing play area space, including reconfiguration of the layout, new play equipment, ADA improvements, benches, seating options, and possible electrical upgrades.
This project improves pedestrian paths and wayfinding along SW Brandon Street and SW Findlay Street to improve neighborhood mobility. Includes work to improve and make more welcoming to the public the trail entries at Camp Long and Longfellow Creek from SW Brandon Street.
Renovate the street-end pocket park located on the eastern shore of Lake Union with goals to:Maintain the waterfront recreational use and character of the small, green pocket park serving the Eastlake neighborhood, enhance the park features with more durable materials, improve accessibility, and incorporate shoreline restoration, as appropriate.
As included in the Parks and Green Spaces Levy language improvements to the park will include improvements to public safety including but not limited to improving sight lines into the park, renovating seating, renovating the former children's play area, improving and expanding lighting, and upgrading landscaping
This project will replace the current failing Amphitheater in Volunteer Park with a modern structure meeting community needs for a versatile outdoor performance space. The replacement will enhance the historic Olmsted landscape, improve the quality of space for daily park users, broaden performance diversity, provide full ADA compliance, reduce net maintenance and operating costs for the facility, and improve acoustics, noise control, safety and access.
The Friends of Arboretum Creek (FOAC) are working to reunite clean, year-round water sources with Arboretum Creek. In 2018, with support from an initial King County grant, FOAC determined the water quality in Alder and Alley Creeks is clean and available to be reunited with Arboretum Creek. Currently, this clean water is routed into the King County Sewer, which reduces needed system capacity. This project will engage the neighborhood community in fundraising for design, additional studies, restoration and outreach.
Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR), in equal partnership with the University of Washington Botanic Gardens (UW), and the Arboretum Foundation (AF) are engaging in a pre-design study for the building of a new Environmental Education Center at Washington Park Arboretum. This new facility will allow the current youth and adult education programming to expand by nearly double those currently served annually. The desired goal is to serve 20,000 children and adults annually from diverse communities across the region.
Seattle Parks and Recreation has secured grant funding to enhance and preserve the Arboretum Waterfront Trail and waterfront access. Thank you to the over 1200 people that participated in our online survey for the Waterfront trail and helped to secure this funding. Please see survey results below.
Seattle Parks and Recreation purchased this .33 acres in 2014 to provide the community access to open space. Seattle Parks and Recreation will work with the community to develop a design for the park. Please participate in the public process as we work together to design your park.
This play area renovation project will enhance safety and improve overall accessibility for young children of all abilities. The small play structure was installed in 1999 and is due for replacement. The new play equipment will be located within the existing enclosure. The concrete path around the play space will be repaired and existing benches will be kept.
This project will replace the aging wooden playfield light poles with metal poles and energy efficient LED lights with hoods. The new lights will reduce light spill into the neighborhood and sky. The project will also update the hub for new wiring and control system.
Seattle Parks and Recreation purchased .65 acres in 2012 to provide the community access to open space within high density urban areas across the city. The Seattle Park District funds the development of this parcel into a park. The design will incorporate accessibility in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and additional park elements will be incorporated after gathering public input. Please participate in the public process as we work together to design your park spaces.
There have been ongoing drainage and erosion concerns at the Westcrest OLA, since at least 2016. Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) is proposing to undertake maintenance activities in and around the Westcrest Park OLA to address these problems. SPR will also be taking this opportunity to bring the north parking lot into compliance with current accessibility standards.
This project redevelops the previous Enterprise Car Rental site into park land that will serve the downtown businesses and residences. It may include lighting, seating, landscaping, ADA access, places for vendors, and other park elements. It will be designed to have a seamless transition between the park and the adjacent tower development. Collaboration, on grading; circulation; materials, between the Parks Department team and the tower design team for areas within the alley which is being vacated, will occur at the schematic design stage.
Your Voice, Your Choice: Parks & Streets is a participatory budgeting initiative in which Seattle residents decide how to spend a portion of the City's budget on small-scale park and street improvements. This program is a partnership between the Department of Neighborhoods (DON), Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), and Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR)