Vibrant Communities

Streets and sidewalks are public spaces and you have the power to transform them with benches, art, greenery and more. As part of our effort to foster vibrant communities throughout the city, we've established the following program goals to:

  • Empower communities through stewardship of public space;
  • Beautify streets and sidewalks with work by local artists;
  • Ensure safety and mobility for the traveling public;
  • Provide excellent customer service to build trust and transparency with the communities we serve.

Our Vibrant Communities program offers free public amenity permits that can be used to install a vareity of elements that enhance the street for the public. Examples include street furniture and decorations, street murals, signal box artwork, and neighborhood pole banners.

Funding for these types of projects may be available through the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods' Neighborhood Matching Fund.

Graphic illustrating the different types of public amenities and where they're located in the right-of-way.

Street Furniture and Decorations

Two curbside wooden slat benches facing each other with greenery nearby

This can be a wide variety of amenities placed in streets or sidewalks intended for public use. Examples include benches, planters, bike racks, tables and chairs, hanging baskets, exercise machines, and sculptural art. They can be used to increase activity in public spaces and make pedestrians and cyclists feel safe and welcome. We encourage you to get creative with the possibilities!  

Get a Street Furniture and Decorations permit!

Street Murals

A colorful mural depicting an orca and the Space Needle surrounding a traffic circle

Street murals, such as intersection painting, add color and express neighborhood identity on residential streets while providing an opportunity for community driven and designed projects. They encourage drivers to slow down and be respectful of neighbors who live nearby. If you are interested in painting a mural as a crosswalk in your neighborhood, please refer to the Community Crosswalks page under our Pedestrian Program.

Get a Street Mural permit!

Signal Box Artwork

A colorful illustration of the hero Momotaro on a signal box in Japantown

Signal box artwork can transform a generic piece of infrastructure into an opportunity for local artists to brighten a neighborhood.

We review proposals for signal box artwork in partnership with the Office of Arts & Culture. 

Get a Signal Box Artwork permit!

Neighborhood Pole Banners

Red and black pole banners on the lamp posts indicating the Pioneer Square neighborhood

Pole banners displaying your neighborhood name foster community identity and make a welcoming statement to anyone visiting the area.

Please note: pole banners advertising an event are not included under the free Public Amenity Permit. For more information, check out the Event Pole Banner Permit.

Get a Neighborhood Pole Banner permit!

Planting in the Right-of-Way

Wooden planter boxes with young plants in the planting strip.

Make your street greener by gardening in the unpaved area between the sidewalk and street, known as the "planting strip". Possibilities include vegetable gardens, ornamental plants, and rain gardens. This permit aims to increase land available for food production and reduce stormwater runoff. If you are interested in a P-Patch, visit the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods' P-Patch Community Gardening page.

Get a Planting in the Right-of-Way permit!

Parklets

A person enjoying outside seating in a neighborhood parklet.

Parklets convert street parking spots into small-scale parks that are available to the public 24/7. They activate streets, support social interaction, and provide a buffer between pedestrians and traffic. Parklets are an invitation to consider how street space can be used for something other than parking, especially in areas with limited open space.

Get a Parklet permit!