Festival Streets

What We Do

Festival Streets are designated portions of streets intended for frequent public events. If you are looking for a street to host a public event, Festival Streets are locations where permitting can be easy and quick. 

Designated Festival Streets

Line map of Seattle indicating the location of our festival streets.

Seattle's designated festival streets are:

  • Canton Alley in the Chinatown-International District (Between 7th Ave S & 8th Ave S, abutting S King St & S Weller St)
  • S Roberto Maestas Festival Street on Beacon Hill (S Lander St between 16th Ave S and 17th Ave S)
  • Nord Alley in Pioneer Square (Between 1st Ave S & Occidental Ave S, abutting S Main St and S Jackson St)
  • Triangle Festival Street in West Seattle (SW Snoqualmie St between 36th Ave SW & 37th Ave SW)
  • E Barbara Bailey Way on Capitol Hill (E Barbara Bailey Way between Broadway E and Nagle Pl)
  • 8th Avenue N in South Lake Union (between Harrison Street and Thomas Street)

Ready to Apply?

The following activities are allowed under a free Block Party permit:

  • Event occurs between 9:00 AM - 10:00 PM (including setup/cleanup)
  • Up to 500 people at a given time

You will need to apply for a Temporary Activation permit instead if:

  • You want to have food vending at your event 
  • Your event is a private event such as a wedding

If your event will have more than 500 people (unenclosed) or more than 99 people (enclosed within a fence), you will need a Special Events Office permit

Why Festival Streets?

In pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use neighborhoods, Festival Streets can become a unique space used by individuals, community groups, and businesses for frequent gatherings and events. Festival streets must be non-arterial streets so there are fewer impacts to mobility and parking. The following types of streets are considered most appropriate for designation as a Festival Street: 

  • Streets in pedestrian-oriented neighborhood commercial areas where festival street activity could reinforce commercial and mixed-use activity 
  • Streets that are direct links to major transit facilities and light rail stations 
  • Streets at critical locations in redeveloping areas that could serve as a focus for new development 
  • Streets that provide safe pedestrian and bicycle connections with neighborhood amenities 

Want to designate a Festival Street in your neighborhood?

A proposal for a new Festival Street designation can be submitted by community groups, individuals, or organizations. Our Director's Rule requires that a proposed Festival Street have support from the surrounding neighborhood and approval by the SDOT Director.

If you're interested in designating a new Festival Street, view the Director's Rule 1-2019. Want to learn more? Email us at publicspace@seattle.gov