Electric Vehicle Charging in the Public Right-of-Way

The Electric Vehicle Charging in the Public Right-of-Way (EVCROW) Pilot Program allows the installation an Electric Vehicle (EV) charging stations at curbside locations in the public right-of-way. These curbside charging stations are available to the public, and existing parking regulations continue to apply.

Through the EVCROW pilot, the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) will provide applicants enhanced support with the required permitting processes and an application coordinator.

Interested in applying? Check out the Program Requirements and submit an application to newmobility@seattle.gov.

Electric vehicles charging

Why Electrify?

EV charging at curbside parking spots helps replace gasoline miles with cleaner electric miles. This switch leads to better air quality that everyone can enjoy because EVs don't have tailpipe emissions and the electricity they're charged with in Seattle is 100% carbon neutral. With curbside EV charging, locals can charge on-the-go and those that live outside the city can take their EV on longer trips because they have more places to charge it when they get here.

Curbside charing benefits

More public charging at curbside locations can help provide diverse charging options to meet the needs of more potential EV drivers, including people who drive EVs for rideshare companies. Right now, most EV owners charge their vehicles at night in their private garage. But here in a city where most people are renters and many don't have a designated parking spot, installing a home charging station is not an option for everyone. Curbside charging benefits EV drivers, and particularly those without reliable home or work charging options.

Drive Clean Seattle

EVCROW is part of the broader Drive Clean Seattle implementation plan, which aims to achieve 30% of a vehicles being electric by 2030. To do this the plan calls for investments in more charging stations, policy changes, and public-private partnerships. So, if you're on-the-fence about going electric, consider that Seattle is working hard right now to make EV driving easier for you.

Current EVCROW Stations

Two EVCROW stations are already up and running on the 2500 block of 16th Avenue South in the North Beacon Hill neighborhood. SDOT is also processing more applications for charging sites across the City that are depicted below. Lessons learned from the EVCROW pilot will be integrated into recommendations for an ongoing EVCROW program. 

The map depicts where organizations have applied to install EV charging and what areas meet the basic requirements for charging installation through EVCROW. If you are interested in applying but have questions about site selection, contact newmobility@seattle.gov.

View the map full-screen in a separate window.

The EVCROW Application Process

Application process

The EVCROW Estimated Timeline

Application estimated timeline

StepDescriptionEstimated Time
1. Applicant Submits Request for Installation (RFIn) Form Send the RFIn form to newmobility@seattle.gov. We will confirm with a receipt of application. 48 hours
2. City of Seattle Staff Review We will review your RFIn and respond with a Letter of Feasibility. 2 weeks
3A. Applicant Applies for SDOT Street Use Permit This involves a Street Use Division 14 day public comment before the permit may be issued. 4-6 weeks
3B. Applicant Submits Service Connection Application Seattle City Light will respond with a Service Requirements Letter. 8-12 weeks
4. SDOT Sends Applicant Final Approval 1 week
5. Begin Construction Applicant must complete all Street Use and SDCI conditions. Duration of construction

These are estimated times and assume the applicant submits all materials and is readily available to answer questions/make changes to the application as needed.