Slide show - Walsh Lake

  • Slide 1. 1929_TaylorTilePlantAerial_sm Contaminated water from the town of Taylor was diverted from Seattle’s water supply in 1931.
  • Slide 2. Walsh Lk_sm Recent water quality testing showed water from the Walsh Lake system is no longer polluted.
  • Slide 3. blowout_sm During a 2009 storm, a 300 foot section of the 40 Road and Walsh Ditch slid down the hill to Rock Creek.
  • Slide 4. Bridge, guillotine prior_sm An old bridge and ditch diversion gate at the Walsh Lake outflow/Rock Creek confluence impeded fish passage.
  • Slide 5. Old 40.5 road_sm An old roadbed separated the Walsh Lake outflow (on the left) from Rock Creek (on the right).
  • Slide 6. 1931 confluence photo_sm In 1931 the confluence area was greatly disturbed during the ditch construction.
  • Slide 7. coho school in Rock below 40 rd_sm Juvenile coho salmon were utilizing Rock Creek just downstream of the restoration project (photo courtesy of Peter Kiffney, NOAA Fisheries).
  • Slide 8. Silt fence_sm First, silt fences were installed to protect the water in Rock Creek during the project.
  • Slide 9. Stream diversion_sm Water was then diverted around the construction site.
  • Slide 10. Removing the old bridge_sm The bridge and diversion gate were deconstructed and debris removed from the site.
  • Slide 11. streambed cobble added_sm The old roadbed was removed and cobble added to the ditch to create a more natural streambed.
  • Slide 12. Log jam3_sm Log jams were created to stabilize the site and provide fish habitat.
  • Slide 13. Planting_sm Over 4,000 trees and shrubs were planted in the restored floodplain.
  • Slide 14. hydroseeding_sm Once construction was complete, the area was hydroseeded with grasses to reduce erosion.
  • Slide 15. one year post_sm One year after project completion, the floodplain was revegetating and normal water flow restored to Rock Creek.
  • Slide 16. RCW high qual habitat_sm The project provided improved fish passage to 7 miles of stream habitat and 130 acres of wetland habitat, along with restored flows in Rock Creek.