About Seattle

 

Population & Households Quick Statistics

Official 2019 estimatesfor Seattle from the WA State Office of Financial Management (released by June 30 each year)

  • Population: 747,300 on April 1, 2019
  • Households: 351,503 on April 1, 2019

Seattle population estimate from the U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimate Program (released each May for previous year): 744,949 on July 1, 2018 (Note: best used for U.S.-wide comparisons.)

2014-2018 5-year American Community Survey (ACS) estimates on demographic characteristics in Seattle

  • Population: 708,823 (+/- 63)
  • Population in households: 686,262 (+/- 1,122)
  • Number of households: 323,446 (+/- 1,814)
  • Average household size: 2.12 (+/- 0.01)
  • Average family size: 2.85 (+/- 0.02)
  • Population in group quarters: 22,561 (+/- 1,117)

Notes: For annual population estimates, the Seattle Office of Planning & Community Development (OPCD) typically relies on the OFM population estimates. However, for comparisons with other cities OPCD uses the U.S. Census Bureau's Population Estimate Program (PEP). Estimates from these two programs are not directly comparable.

The most up to date 1-year estimates and 5-year estimates about Seattle's residents and households are available on the Census Bureau's new data portal, data.census.gov.  Keep in mind that ACS estimates carry margins of error and are intended to provide an overview of characteristics, not precise counts.

2010 Census estimates for Seattle from the U.S. Census Bureau:

  • 2010 population count: 608,660
  • Population in households: 583,735
  • Number of households: 283,510
  • Average household size: 2.06
  • Average family size: 2.87
  • Population in group quarters: 24,925  

Be Counted in the 2020 Census

There is still time to fill out your Census form. Go online today at www.2020census.gov. The decennial Census provides the country's official population count and determines our share of federal funding and representation in Congress. It also provides data that local institutions need to serve communities. The City is partnering with community leaders to help you know your rights and be counted. Visit www.seattlecensus.org for more info.

Highlights

  • Seattle is 18th most populous city in the U.S. Seattle has the largest population of cities in King County, the broader Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue Metro Area, and the state of Washington.
  • Recent population growth: Seattle's population grew rapidly between 2010 and 2019, driven by the strength of our local economy and job opportunities.
    • The state Office of Financial Management (OFM) estimates that Seattle's population was 747,300 as of 2019, which is 22 percent higher than in 2010. This reflects a significantly faster rate of growth than in King County as a whole, which grew by 15 percent over the same period.
    • The U.S. Census Bureau's Population Estimate Program (PEP) estimated Seattle's 2018 population at 744,955. This is 11 percent higher than the Bureau estimated for 2014, making Seattle the fastest growing city in the U.S. over this five-year period. (This comparison is based on the 50 most populous cities in 2018.)
  • Household size: Household sizes were on a downward trend for several decades leading up to the 2010 census, at which point the average household size in Seattle was 2.06. Since 2010, the average household size in the city has increased and was estimated to be 2.12 in the 2014-2018 5-year ACS data.

    This recent trend is explained in part by the decrease in the share of households that are comprised of one person; this share went from 41 percent as measured by the 2010 Census to 39 percent based on the 2014-2018 5-year ACS.
  • Age distribution: The 2014-2018 5-year ACS estimates indicate that three-quarters of Seattle residents are adults between 18 and 64 years of age, with an especially high and growing concentration of young adults ages 25 to 34. Since 2010, adults of ages 65 to 74 have had the highest rate of growth among different age categories, reflecting aging of the baby boom population.

 Age Distribution of Seattle's Population Bar Graph

Featured Products

Mapping apps for accessing neighborhood-level data

Census 2010 Reports for Seattle

Key Data Sources

U.S. Census Bureau Data

Two major Census Bureau programs that provide data on housing at a community and neighborhood level are:

  • The decennial census is done every 10 years to provide counts and basic information about population, households, and housing units. Housing characteristics covered in the census include occupancy and vacancy rates and tenure (owner or renter) for occupied units.
  • The American Community Survey (ACS) is a continuous survey that produces estimates on a broad set of population, social, economic, and housing characteristics. Housing topics on the ACS extend beyond those on the decennial census and include type of structure (single-family or multifamily), home value, monthly housing costs, and more.

    The ACS has replaced the long form that used to be part of the decennial Census. Because the ACS is a sample survey, ACS estimates carry margins of error.

The Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) provides estimates for the U.S., states, metropolitan statistical areas, counties, and cities. PEP estimates for Seattle are best used for comparisons with geographies outside Washington state.

The Washington State Office of Financial Management (OFM):

The Puget Sound Regional Council

Where to Go From Here

Housing Quick Statistics

2019 Estimates for Seattle from the WA State Office of Financial Management (OFM) (estimates below are for April 1, 2019)

  • Total housing units: 367,806
  • Occupied housing units: 351,503
  • Household population: 718,136
  • Group quarters population: 29,114  

2014-2018 5-year American Community Survey (ACS) estimates on housing characteristics in Seattle

  • Total housing units: 344,503 (+/- 1,632)
  • Occupied housing units: 323,446 (+/- 1,814)
  • Owner-occupied housing units: 149,017 (+/- 2,207) (or 46.1 percent)
  • Renter-occupied housing units: 174,429 (+/- 2,393) (or 53.9 percent)
  • Ave. household size in owner-occupied units: 2.40 persons (+/- 0.02)
  • Ave. household size in renter-occupied units: 1.89 persons (+/- 0.02)

Notes: More detail on housing characteristics from the ACS 1-year estimates and 5-year estimates are available on the Census Bureau's new data portal, data.census.gov. Keep in mind that ACS estimates carry margins of error and are intended to provide estimates related to characteristics rather than official counts.

2010 Census Estimates:

  • Total housing units: 308,516
  • Occupied housing units: 283,510
  • Owner-occupied housing units: 136,362 (48.1 percent)
  • Renter-occupied housing units: 147,148 (51.9 percent)
  • Average household size: 2.06 persons
  • Ave. household size in owner-occupied units: 2.31 persons
  • Ave. household size in renter-occupied units: 1.83 persons

Highlights

Trends:

  • Housing growth: As of 2019, there were 367,806 housing units in Seattle, representing a 19 percent increase since 2010 (according to Washington State Office of Financial Management).  The growth in the number of housing units in Seattle from 2010 to 2019 surpassed the 14 percent growth seen between 2000 and 2010.  However, even with the rapid increase this decade, expansion of our housing stock has not kept up with Seattle's population growth of 22 percent between 2010 and 2019.

As King County's largest and densest city, Seattle typically adds housing at a slower pace than the county as a whole.  However, the city has added housing at an accelerating pace each decade since 1960 and outpaced countywide growth (which was about 12%) between 2010 and 2019. 

  • Occupied housing units: The ACS estimates for the 2014-2018 five-year period show 93.8 percent of an estimated 323,446 total housing units in Seattle as occupied.
  • Tenure (owner- and renter-occupancy): The 2010 census showed a bit more than half of Seattle's occupied housing units (51.9%) were renter-occupied. In comparison, the five-year ACS estimates for 2014-2018 show 53.9 percent of occupied units as rentals.  The increase in the prevalence of renting since 2010 extends the path of declining homeownership rates that Seattle has been following each decade since 1960.  (This trend was briefly interrupted when homeownership rates in Seattle increased in the 2000s before the Great Recession wiped away those gains.)

Household sizes tend to be larger in owner-occupied housing than in renter-occupied housing. In 2010 there were 2.31 persons per household in Seattle's owner-occupied units compared to 1.83 persons per household in renter-occupied units. Departing from trends in past decades, average household sizes in Seattle increased between the 2010 census and the five years represented in the 2014-2018 ACS. This happened in both owner-occupied and renter-occupied housing. (Average household size went from 2.31 persons to 2.40 persons among owner households and went from 1.83 to 1.89 among renter households). As of the 2014-2018 ACS, owner-occupied units still house more than half of Seattle's overall household population even though these owner-occupied housing units are outnumbered by renter-occupied units.

Housing costs:

  • An analysis that OPCD conducted using a special tabulation of 5-year ACS data for 2011-2015 showed that over two-thirds of low-income households in Seattle were cost-burdened, i.e., paying more than 30 percent of their income for housing. Cost burdens are disproportionately shouldered by people of color.  The same data showed that more than a quarter of Black households were paying over half of their income for housing.
  • Housing costs have increased. The most recent data we have from the ACS, single-year data shows that the median cost for rent and basic utilities was roughly 35 percent higher in 2018 than it was in the 2011-2015 five-year period-and this is after adjusting for inflation. The run-up in rents has placed more housing outside the reach of low- and moderate-income renters.
  • None of these data reflect the extreme difficulty with paying for housing that many people are having now after being laid off during the new coronavirus pandemic.

Seattle's Comprehensive Plan Growth Strategy:

  • Seattle's current Comprehensive Plan anticipates at least 70,000 housing units citywide over the 20-year planning period from 2015 to 2035. These estimates are based on the city's share of the growth that OFM had previously projected for King County. Seattle's Growth Strategy guides most of the city's growth to urban centers and urban villages.
    • As shown in the Urban Center / Village Residential Growth Report, Seattle added 34,117 housing units from the beginning of 2016 to the end of 2019.  This represents roughly 49 percent of the 70,000 housing units that the current Comprehensive Plan anticipated for the 20-year planning period ending in 2035.  In addition, more than 20,000 units were in the pipeline (permitted to be built but not yet finished) as of the end of 2019.
    • Our Urban Village Indicators Monitoring Report analyzes additional indicators related to housing growth and affordability and other key aspects of livability to gauge progress in implementing the Comprehensive Plan. We will be analyzing these indicators again to inform the next Comprehensive Plan update.  In the meantime, see our Monitoring Dashboard for regular updates on indicators related to housing growth and employment growth.

New growth projections will be incorporated in the next major update of the Comprehensive Plan, which is due in 2024.

  • In partnership with King County, the City is updating the existing Buildable Lands Report to support the upcoming update to the Comprehensive Plan.  The report will update the City's development capacity estimates, ensuring that we have room for projected growth in housing and jobs. 

Featured Products

New Housing Units in Seattle

Our Residential Permit Reports mapping app and data portal provides access to handy reports that we update periodically based on our building permit data. The reports available include: 

  • The Citywide Residential Permits Report - this shows the number of permits in recent years-by housing type-for new units and for demolished units. Completed permits are reported by year the permit was finaled.  The report also shows the number of building permits that have been issued.
  • The Urban Center / Village Residential Growth Report - this shows the net number of housing units added in the city and in individual urban centers and villages during the current Comprehensive Plan planning period.

Mapping apps for accessing neighborhood-level data

Census 2010 Reports for Seattle

Key Data Sources

U.S. Census Bureau Data

  Two major Census Bureau programs that provide data on housing at a community and neighborhood level are:  

  • The decennial census - done every 10 years to provide counts and basic information about population, households, and housing units. Housing characteristics covered in the census include occupancy and vacancy rates and tenure (owner or renter) for occupied units.
  • The American Community Survey (ACS) - a continuous survey that produces estimates on a broad set of population, social, economic, and housing characteristics. Housing topics on the ACS extend beyond those on the decennial census and include type of structure (single-family or multifamily), home value, monthly housing costs, and more. Because the ACS is a sample survey, ACS estimates carry margins of error.

The Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) - provides estimates for the U.S., states, metropolitan statistical areas, counties, and cities. PEP estimates for Seattle are best used for comparisons with geographies outside Washington state.

The Washington State Office of Financial Management (OFM) - The Office of Financial Management's Forecasting Division compiles housing data as part of its financial and growth management functions.

The Puget Sound Regional Council - PSRC provides forecasts and a wealth of data at a range of geographic scales as part of its work to support planning in the region. These data resources include:

  • A regional forecast that includes households, persons, jobs, and other variables through the year 2050
  • A set of Land Use Vision (LUV) projections indicating how cities and other areas in the region could grow based on assumptions developed with help from local planners

Where to Go from Here

Prosperity Quick Statistics

About People Living in Seattle

2016 American Community Survey (ACS) estimates:

  • Share of population (25 years and older) with a bachelor's degree or higher: 63%
  • Most common type of occupation (for civilian employed residents 16 years and older): 60% work in management, business, science, and arts
  • Household median income: $83,476
  • Family median income: $118,745
  • Per capita income: $55,184
  • Poverty rate: 11.5% 

About Jobs in Seattle

2016 Covered Employment Estimates from the Puget Sound Regional Council:

  • Number of jobs located in Seattle: 567,000, not including construction/resource jobs

Job Growth Planned for in Seattle's Comprehensive Plan:

  • Anticipated growth in jobs during the 20-year planning period of 2016 to 2035: 115,000

Highlights

Seattle Covered Employment pie chart

  • Educational attainment: Seattleites as a group are highly educated. Estimates for 2016 from the American Community Survey (ACS) indicate that 63 percent of Seattle residents 25 years and older have a bachelor's degree or higher and 27 percent have a graduate or professional degree.

    In the Seattle metro area, 42 percent of people in this age group have at least a bachelor's degree. In the U.S. as a whole, 31 percent have a bachelor's degree or higher, which is less than half the share in Seattle.

  • Labor force and occupations: Seattle has a high concentration of people in prime working-age groups and a high labor force participation rate. A large share of Seattle's residents work in management, business, science, and arts occupations. In 2016, 60 percent of Seattle's civilian employed population 16 and older worked in this general category of occupations. This compares to 46 percent in the broader metro area and 38 percent in the nation as a whole.

2016 ACS Income Estimates graph

  • Median incomes: The 2016 American Community Survey (ACS) estimated the Seattle median household income to be about $83,500. This is well above the national median household income, and slightly higher than the median household income for the Seattle metro area. The 2016 ACS estimate for Seattle's median family income is $119,000, a figure markedly higher than median family income in the broader Seattle metro area.
  • Poverty: The 2016 ACS estimated that 11.5 percent of Seattle residents had incomes below the poverty threshold. This compares to 9.6 percent in the broader metro area, and 14.0 percent in the U.S. as a whole. Poverty rates captured in the 2016 ACS are somewhat lower than those from the 2011 ACS, reflecting the ongoing recovery from the Great Recession and recent economic growth in the region. (The poverty threshold in 2016 for a family of three with one child under 18 was roughly $19,000.)
  • Jobs in Seattle: The City historically used covered employment to track employment. Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) estimates that that there were 558,023 covered jobs in Seattle workplaces as of March of 2016. Covered jobs are those covered by the Washington state Unemployment Insurance Act and typically comprise about 85 to 90 percent of the total employment in an area.

    The chart below shows annual changes in covered employment, including declines due to the two recessions that began in 2001 (when the dot-com bubble burst) and in 2008 (when the Great Recession began) as well as increases during periods of recovery.

    Between 2015 and 2016, the city gained about 22,600 covered jobs. This was sixth straight year that Seattle experienced job growth within the current economic expansion and the largest one-year increase in Seattle recorded since PSRC began tracking covered employment.

    Annual Change in Covered Employment in Seattle, 2010-2016
  • Job Growth Planned for in Seattle's Comprehensive Plan: In the Puget Sound Region, jurisdictions adopt growth targets for jobs as well as housing. The City of Seattle is anticipating an additional 115,000 jobs between the beginning of 2016 and the end of 2035.

Featured Products and Resources

Decennial Census and ACS Estimates for Seattle

Jobs and Employment Report

Key Data Sources

U.S. Census Bureau Data
Census Bureau programs that provide data on housing at a community and neighborhood level include:

The Census Bureau operates two major programs that provide data on people and households based on place of residence down to the city level and neighborhood levels:

  • The decennial census is done every 10 years to count the population and gather basic information about population demographics, households, and housing units. Census topics include age, sex, race, Hispanic ethnicity, household composition, owner / renter status, and group quarters populations.
  • The American Community Survey is a continuous survey that produces estimates on a broad set of population, social, economic, and housing characteristics. Examples of survey topics include education, labor force participation, incomes, earnings, commutes to work, and the occupations and industries in which residents are employed. The survey also asks about housing values and rents. The American Community Survey has replaced the long form that used to be part of the decennial census.

Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC)
PSRC provides a variety of economic data, including estimates of employment, and produces forecasts at a wide range of geographic scales as part of their work to support planning in the region.

Where to Go From Here

Race & Ethnicity Quick Statistics

Demographics of COVID-19 cases, including by race and ethnicity:

Important note: As of April 12, race/ethnicity data are missing for a large number of cases. Until these data are more complete, conclusions that can be reached will be limited.

2014-2018 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year Estimates (U.S. Census Bureau)

  • Race/ethnicity:
    White - 64.5% (+/- 0.4 percentage pts.)
    Black or African American - 6.8% (+/- 0.3 percentage pts.)
    American Indian & Alaska Native - 0.5% (+/- 0.1 percentage pts.)
    Asian - 14.9% (+/- 0.4 percentage pts.)
    Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander - 0.3% (+/- 0.1 percentage pts.)
    Other race - 0.3% (+/- 0.1 percentage pts.)
    Two or more races - 6.0% (+/- 0.2 percentage pts.)
    Hispanic or Latino ethnicity (of any race): 6.6% (+/- 0.3 percentage pts.)

    Persons of color: 35.5% (+/- 0.4 percentage pts.)

  • Foreign born: 18.5% (+/- 0.4 percentage pts.)
  • Population (age 5+) speaking language other than English at home: 21.2% (+/- 0.4 percentage pts.)

Highlights

  • Overall, persons of color make up more than a third of Seattle's population. The 2014-2018 ACS estimates that about 35.5% of Seattle residents are people of color.
  • Largest racial/ethnic groups of color in Seattle-Based on the 2014-2018 ACS, Asians comprise the largest group of color (14.9% of the city's population). The next two most populous groups of color are persons of Black or African American race (6.8%) and persons who are of Hispanic/Latino ethnicity, any race (6.6%). Six percent of Seattle residents indicated two or more races.Race and Ethnicity of Seattle Population Pie Chart 
  • Fastest growing groups-Since 2010, multiracial people and Asians have been the fastest growing groups.
  • Growth of the population of color in Seattle compared with the rest of King County. While people of color have been increasing as a share of the population, the increase in Seattle has occurred at a much slower pace than in the rest of King County and the overall United States. The accompanying charts shows growth between the  2010 Census estimates and the five-year period captured in the 2014-2018 ACS estimates.)
    Bar Graph of Population Growth
  • Socioeconomic disparities-Recent estimates from sources including the ACS show continued, deep disparities in the social and economic well-being of Seattle residents.

    Disparities by race and ethnicity due to inequitable conditions and a legacy of institutionalized racism are evident in every major indicator of well-being measured in the ACS: education, income, unemployment rates, homeownership, housing costs burdens, vehicle availability, and others.

    In general, the data broken out for basic racial and ethnic categories finds White, non-Hispanic people to be the most advantaged while Blacks, Native Americans, and Pacific Islanders tend to be the most disadvantaged. Indicators of well-being are also commonly worse for Hispanics and Latinos that for the White, non-Hispanic population. Asians and multi-race persons are also doing more poorly than non-Hispanic Whites on some of these indicators.

    Disparities between subgroups may be masked in estimates for a broad racial group. For example, among Asians in Seattle, those who are Cambodian, Hmong, Thai, or Vietnamese tend to have lower household income levels and lower education levels than residents who are Asian Indian, Chinese, or Taiwanese.

    Seattle's Race and Social Justice Initiative (RSJI) is working to reduce these kinds of socioeconomic disparities.

Featured Products

Mapping apps providing race, ethnicity, and other neighborhood demographics:

  • Racial and Social Equity Index

The index combines three sub-indices related to race & ethnicity, socioeconomic disadvantage, and health disadvantage to identify where RSJI priority populations and disadvantaged populations make up relatively large proportions of residents.

The City demographer designed this index with interdepartmental consultation to help prioritize neighborhoods for programs, planning, and investments.

Click here or for a detailed view. The index is also available on ArcGIS Online, and on this interactive mapping app.
Racial and Social Equity Index Map

  • Our Exploring the Patterns of People app provides access to census tract-level ACS estimates on race/ethnicity language spoken, region of birth for immigrants, and other topics.
  • This About Seattle's Neighborhoods mapping app provides access to decennial census and ACS data for selected neighborhood geographies.
  • Maps on Language Spoken
    This mapping app provides Census tract-level estimates from the ACS for the shares of population (age 5 and older) who speak the following languages at home: Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, African Languages, Tagalog, Korean, and Mon-Khmer.  Maps are also provided for the overall share of the population who speak a language other than English and those who say they speak English less than very well.

    Hints: The 5-year 2009-2013 estimates in the app provide the widest variety of languages.  The Census Bureau has stopped producing this data on most languages at the tract level. Click on a census tract, to get more detail on languages spoken there. ACS estimates can have very large margins of error. Concentrations on these maps are best viewed as general locations of language communities.

Census 2010 Citywide Reports and Maps:

Key Data Sources

U.S. Census Bureau Data
Two Census Bureau programs-the American Community Survey and the decennial census, provide the most commonly used demographic data available at a community and neighborhood level. Descriptions and links for accessing data are below.

The Census Bureau provides guidance on how to access race data on data/census/gov using the Bureau's new data portal. (For more, details, see this on transition to data.census.gov from the old American Factfinder data portal.)

  • The American Community Survey (ACS) is a continuous, sample-based survey that produces estimates on a broad set of population, social, economic, and housing characteristics. The ACS covers language spoken at home, education, employment, income, vehicle availability, monthly housing costs, and more. The ACS provides estimates for the population as a whole, individual race and ethnic groups, and the foreign born.  (ACS estimates carry margins of error and should be used carefully.)

Selected Population Tables for hundreds of racial, Hispanic/Latino origin, and ancestry population groups. Local estimates for many of these groups are available at the city or metro area level. This spreadsheet has links to the 2011-2015 ACS data profiles with demographic, social, economic, and housing characteristics iterated for the total population and basic race/ethnicity groups.  Includes Seattle, King County, the larger metro area and metro division, WA state, and the U.S.

American Indian and Alaska Native Tables from the ACS are available down to the Metro area level for more detailed tribal populations.

Washington State Office of Financial Management (OFM)
OFM produces annual population estimates by age, sex, race and Hispanic/Latino origin for the state and county, and for small areas including school districts and census tracts.  See Small Area Demographic Estimates (SADE) FAQ for more details and note that SADE data should not be used for looking at trends.

Detailed guidance for accessing disaggregated data for detailed race/ethnic groups. We have created an in-depth guide to make it easier to access statistics for detailed race/ethnic groups from the Census Bureau and other sources. We have plans to update this guide in 2020.

Where to Go From Here

Land Use Quick Statistics

How Seattle's Land Is Used

  • Seattle's area: 53,113 acres (83 square miles)
  • People per acre in 2012: 11.6
  • Acres of rights-of-way: 14,170
  • Acres of parks and open space owned by the City of Seattle: 5,003
  • Acres of open space per 1,000 residents in 2012: 8.9
  • Percent of the population that lives with ¼ mile of a city-owned open space: 85%
  • Percent of the city in single-family zoning (excluding parks and rights-of-way): 54%

How Seattle's Transit Measures Up

  • Nearly all of Seattle’s population, 97.5%, lives within ¼ mile of a transit stop with some level of service
  • Ranks 7th of the 25 largest U.S. cities in transit service with a Transit Score of 59 (Walk Score)
  • Ranks 6th of the 50 largest U.S. cities for walkability with a Walk Score of 74 (Walk Score)

Highlights

Existing land use in Seattle: 49% for Single-family, 14% for parks/open space/cembetaries, 11% for major institutions and public facilities/utilities, 8% for multifamily, 6% for commercial/mixed-use, 5% for industrial, and 5% vacant. Of the new residential units built between 2005 and 2012, 40%  were in Urban Centers, 19% were outside Urban Villages, 19% were in Residential Urban Villages, and 14% were in Hub Urban Villages
  • Residential construction permits: Seattle is experiencing high volumes of residential permits with historic highs of residential units in the permit pipeline for 2012. View the new residential unit graph.
  • Land use distribution: Seattle's land area remains mostly single-family in nature, but most residential development capacity, 93.5 percent, is in the multifamily zoning types with 73 percent in designated growth areas. View the existing land use pie chart.
  • Seattle Comprehensive Plan growth estimates for 2024: From 2004-2012 Seattle added 29,330 net new housing units representing 62 percent of the City’s 20-year growth estimate of 47,000 housing units. Much of that residential growth, 73 percent, has been occurring in the multifamily urban centers and villages. View the residential capacity pie chart.

Featured Products

Key Data Sources

Seattle Department of Construction and Inspections

King County

Walk Score

Where to Go From Here

  • See our Neighborhoods page for similar information by different neighborhoods
  • Visit the Department of Neighborhoods website for similar information, maps, and tables for individual neighborhoods
  • Visit the Department of Construction and Inspections permit portal for information about specific permits or obtaining a permit
  • Learn about Seattle’s Walk Score

Seattle's Neighborhoods

Seattle is a city of neighborhoods of diverse character and strong identities. City departments and non-City entities define neighborhoods differently based on many factors. Some districts and neighborhoods are informal with varying boundaries and names. Some neighborhoods may overlap and be referred to by different names by community members.

To clarify neighborhood boundaries for the purposes of data reporting and monitoring, we have selected four different neighborhood geographies.

Census Urban Centers and Villages Small Reference Map Census Community Reporting Areas Small Reference Map

Urban Centers and Villages

Urban Centers and Villages are areas designated in Seattle's Comprehensive Plan to accommodate future population and job growth and help guide city planning policies.

 

Community Reporting Areas

Community Reporting Areas (CRAs) were established as a standard, consistent, citywide geography for the purposes of reporting U.S. Census related information. There are 53 CRAs composed from one to six census tracts.

Seattle Council Districts Map PUMAs Small Reference Map

Council Districts

There are seven Seattle City Council seats elected in Council Districts 1-7 with another two positions elected "at-large". The other two positions will be elected "at-large" (city-wide) in positions 8 and 9.

 

PUMAs

A PUMA (public use microdata area) is a census area that comprises at least 100,000 people and is the smallest geography for which annual American Community Survey data is available. There are five PUMAs in Seattle.


Click on the bar below to begin exploring Seattle's interactive map.

Enter Seattle's Neighborhoods Portal   

A note on geography: For U.S. Census data, the City uses different combinations of census tracts, block groups, and blocks to best approximate the various neighborhoods and sub-areas of Seattle. If a neighborhood boundary splits a block group or tract, that block group or tract is included if 50% or more of its population lives within the neighborhood boundary.