Spay and Neuter Clinic

New hours effective Jan. 9, 2019.

Admitting hours: 10-11 a.m.
Discharge hours: 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Closed to the public: 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Spay and neuter surgeries at our clinic are performed by appointment only, Monday through Friday (excluding holidays). To allow our staff to focus on providing the best care possible to your pets, our clinic is closed to the public during surgery hours.

The clinic is accessible to everyone regardless of income or place of residence. For those who cannot afford the surgery, the Pet Population Control Fund is available to help cover your costs. Donations to the Pet Population Control Fund are also accepted.

Why choose the Seattle Animal Shelter Spay and Neuter Clinic?

The Spay and Neuter Clinic at the Seattle Animal Shelter is committed to providing compassionate and quality care to your pet and low-cost spay and neuter surgeries to any dog or cat in need. Our promise is to take good care of both you and your pet.

  • We specialize in spay/neuter surgeries, from the very simple to the very complicated. Our clinic does not accept walk-in appointments or emergencies, so we can remain completely focused on the pets in our care.
  • Our veterinarians are experienced and have performed thousands of surgeries over the years. The other members of the surgical team are skilled licensed veterinary technicians (LVTs).
  • We have a wide range of anesthetic options and can select the one that is best suited for your pet.
  • Each surgery is performed with an individual steam-sterilized surgical pack, and our suture material is the same as used in human surgeries.
  • Our surgical team closely monitors each pet's vital signs including breathing rate, heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure and even EKG (if indicated).
  • We practice pre-emptive analgesia (pain management). Each pet receives pain medication before even feeling any pain, which means fewer drugs and less discomfort for your pet.
  • All dogs, cats and rabbits will receive a small green tattoo near their incision, which is a universal sign of spay or neuter surgery.