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The Seattle Open Housing Campaign, 1959-1968 - Home
Introduction
Restrictive Covenants
O'Meara v. Washington State Board Against Discrimination
State Fair Housing Legislation
The NAACP Request
The Citizens' Advisory Committee on Minority Housing
Protest: Sit-in and Freedom March, 1963
"An Open Hearing for Closed Minds"
The People Vote
Years of Ferment: 1964-1967
Open Housing, 1968
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The Seattle Open Housing Campaign, 1959-1968

Protest: Sit-in and Freedom March, 1963

5th Avenue Rally
Demonstration at City Hall, July 1, 1963

The Mayor and City Council delayed action on the Advisory Committee recommendations for a year. In protest of the inaction, the Rev. Mance Jackson and Rev. Samuel McKinney organized a march on City Hall on July 1, 1963. A large sign-carrying crowd met on the Fifth Avenue Plaza at City Hall.

The City Council meeting held that day on open housing was attended by more than 300 people. At the end of the march and the meeting, about 35 young people from the Central District Youth Club occupied the Mayor's office for nearly 24 hours, participating in Seattle's first sit-in. The protestors stated, "As citizens of Seattle and members of the Central District Youth Club, we feel humiliated by the slow process of the City of Seattle to adopt open housing." The sit-in ended only after an hour-long conference between the Youth Club and the Rev. Mance Jackson, Rev. John Adams and the Rev. Samuel McKinney.


Sit-in
Sit-in at Mayor's office, July 3, 1963
City Council Sit-in
Sit-in at Seattle City Council hearing

On August 28, 1963, Rev. Dr. John H. Adams, Chairman of the Central Area Committee on Civil Rights, organized a Freedom March and Rally concurrent with Martin Luther King's March in Washington, D.C. 1,000 demonstrators marched down Madison Street to the Federal Court House.

Freedom March
Freedom March, August 28, 1963
Freedom March
Freedom March, August 28, 1963

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