Current Projects

Seattle Parks and Recreation values the community's commitment and support to our parks and green spaces. One of our goals is to actively engage and build relationships with Seattle's diverse population. From this page, we invite you to explore information on how to get involved with Parks and to learn the best way to provide input or participate in public processes.

Seattle Parks and Recreation is funded through the Seattle Park District, general funds, previous levies, and our supporting non-profits. Learn more about our funding sources and how we get financing for projects.
Situated between the Central Area and Capitol Hill, the 7,332 square-foot park is considered part of both communities. The park space will be used to strengthen community ties through programming local events and offering a great gathering place. The artistic sculptural canopy structure called "Cloud Veil" that hovers over a rounded "pillow" and the wavy concrete paving design grew out of the Hewitt and Sollod collaboration. Several other smaller pillows for seating are sprinkled through the space. The park's unique design also includes rain gardens to extend the feeling of open space for the entire block on E. James Court, a single east-bound lane.
The project converts two full blocks of 14th Ave. NW to a new park between NW 59th and NW 61st streets with transition lanes to the park from the north and south. A park will replace the gravel parking median and portions of the existing concrete roadway. The project includes green infrastructure and incorporates safety improvements for pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles.
This Seattle Park District project was funded to provide the community access to open space within high density urban areas across the city.
This project is part of an ongoing design program to replace outmoded lighting systems at various fields throughout the park system. The new lighting systems will reduce light spill into neighboring communities and night skies. The new systems will also be more energy efficient and provide safe, uniform lighting levels for the users. At this field, some of the existing poles and fixtures will be demolished. New poles, fixtures and electrical control equipment will be installed.
Project improvements include the installation of new retaining walls and pathway widening, pathway removals, and plant restoration.
The project will replace the existing lighted natural turf playfield (soccer, baseball, softball. . .) with a new lighted and renovated 200,000 square foot synthetic turf field. We will be looking at new/upgraded accessible pathways, spectator areas, reuse of existing seating/bleachers and connections with other existing park features.
The goal of the neighborhood project is to design and build a new neighborhood park that is welcoming for all neighbors. The preferred schematic has been developed. It has a large lawn area, seating at a "front porch" area at the top of the site and on a seat wall alongside the sidewalk. There will be community gardening (as part of the p-Patch program), opportunities for natural play and for artwork.
Repair trail at prioritized sites as determined by 2015 condition assessment currently under way in collaboration with Seattle Department of Transportation.
The current development project will add much needed public green space to the busy Madison corridor, link the Central District and Capitol Hill, represent the community through design and the namesake history and beautify what is currently an empty lot.
Cedar Park Renovation project provides for the retrofit of the existing play features, improvement to site circulation and access, and upgrades to meet current safety and American with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards. The renovation project occurs in the existing play area only. Existing play equipment including swing set and sand area will be removed. New play equipment and ADA access will be installed.
The Cheasty Mountain Bike and Pedestrian Trail Pilot Project will provide recreational opportunities for families and neighbors to access nature through our urban park greenspaces. The project site is an urban greenspace that has been heavily logged and is overgrown with invasive species. Work is underway by the Green Seattle Partnership to restore the area. The trail is designed to work in harmony with this restoration effort.
Restore the slope at the west edge of Colman Park to the historic design planned by the Olmsted Brothers. This first phase of the project will include an assessment of the slope, gathering of community input, and the development of a long-range Vegetation Management Plan.
In 2015, the King County Wastewater Treatment Division finished the upgrade to the Barton Pump Station, next to the Fauntleroy Ferry Terminal, to accommodate West Seattle's growing population. As part of the construction of the new pump station, King County acquired the property just to the north of SW Barton Street, which was used as their temporary construction offices. Now that the project is finished, King County no longer needs the property and is proposing to trade it to the City in exchange for the vacation of the portion of the SW Barton Street right-of-way where the pump station is constructed.
The project includes replacement of the park's pathways and paved areas. In addition, storm drainage, sanitary sewer and irrigation systems will be replaced and upgraded. Potential modifications to the central plaza area may be included in the project and would improve pedestrian circulation, enhance ADA accessibility and provide a more functional community gathering space. Other proposed improvements may include a new central raingarden feature, new benches and planting bed modifications.
Replace playground equipment which will include play elements and access for children of all ages and abilities.
Recent public planning through the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition's Healthy Communities program (2013) and Seattle Parks Foundation's South Park Green Spaces Vision Plan (2014) have identified Duwamish Waterway Park as a key open space in the community in need of improvement. There is a strong interest from the community to create more amenities to draw people to the park.
Generally, this proposal enhances the new park and P-patch by adding a bioswale, planting area and providing better pedestrian connections and is based on the Opportunity Fund application. Please see three design alternatives reviewed at the meeting.
This project aims to envision, research, enhance, and design a new future for First Hill Park. The process is to be based in an understanding of the community's desires and needs, with the ultimate goal of implementing a design with the most positive impact for the greatest number of people.
Seattle Parks and Recreation, The Trust for Public Land, The Seattle Parks Foundation, and MOMentum are teaming up to bring free outdoor gyms called Fitness Zone ares to parks in Seattle. Each one is equipped with top quality, durable exercise equipment appropriate for teens and adults of all levels of fitness
The scope of this project brings the play area into compliance with current play area safety standards and guideline efforts of the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) as well as meets the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
This Seattle Park District project will replace playground equipment which will include play elements and access for children of all ages and abilities.
Install updated play equipment and improve access to the at Gilman Playground. The play equipment will include play structures and seating accessible to children of all ages and abilities and also other elements for play.
This project provides drainage improvements and replaces the damaged stairway steps from the lower park area to the dog-off-leash- area. The purpose of the project is to renovate the existing storm drainage system that collects and directs some of the park surface and subsurface drainage flows from the upper road through the mid-parking lot at the dog-off-leash- area to the appropriate drainage area The scope will include replacing damaged steps with a new stairway, and replacing the drainage channel from the top of the steps to the open channel.
The 2016 alum treatment is intended to reduce phosphorus levels in the lake, limiting cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) blooms and improving recreational use of the lake. The alum treatment is applied from a barge on the lake. The treatment is pumped from a truck staged in the parking lot through hoses that will run over the Green Lake path to the barge. These hoses will require a small ramp to allow Green Lake path users to travel safely over them.
This Seattle Park District project was funded to provide the community access to open space within high density urban areas across the city.
This initiative will further develop the partnership between Seattle Parks and Recreation and Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) to enhance and activate connection points from Neighborhood Greenways to parks, with parks-oriented expertise. Greenways are a key component of the 2014 Seattle Bicycle Master Plan, comprising 250 miles or 41% of the total proposed network. These corridors enhance safe, calm residential streets designed to give bicycle and pedestrian travel priority. They provide people of all ages and abilities with comfortable and attractive places to walk and ride.
This project was selected for the second round of Parks and Green Spaces Levy Opportunity Funding. The application received in this community-initiated process is a preliminary concept and the final design may be constrained by the project budget. All projects will go through Park’s public involvement procedure which includes public meetings and community input. They will also go through an internal Parks process to ensure the most effective implementation.
Renovation of existing park and development of park on land acquired with 2000 Pro Parks Levy.
The improvements to Jimi Hendrix Park will create space that is welcoming and provides an experience that clearly defines its namesake. Phase 1 of the park development, designated "Little Wing," will include a new stairway and entrance at the southeast corner of the park, paved pathways, a chronological timeline of Jimi's life and career, enhanced landscaping with trees and native plantings, seatwall benches, ADA accessible walkways, rainwater infiltration gardens and a butterfly garden.
This project will remove safety hazard situations at the southeast area of Danny Woo Garden including deteriorated trail, broken retaining wall, stairway, handrail, etc. and restore the slope with cherry trees, mulch, and some mass of low dry tolerant ground covers.
The Parks and Green Spaces Levy provides $24 million for the acquisition of neighborhood parks in up to 20 identified areas throughout the City. The Lake City Residential Urban Village was included in that list. Seattle Parks and Recreation will begin planning this space in 2016.
The application received in this community-initiated process is a preliminary concept and the final design may be constrained by the project budget. All projects will go through Park’s public involvement procedure which includes public meetings and community input. They will also go through an internal Parks process to ensure the most effective implementation.
This project, funded with 2008 Parks Levy funds redirected from the Seattle Asian Art Museum renovation project, investigates and repairs subsidence issues in walkway areas at Lake Union Park, along the north side of the park adjacent to the water, and east and north of the pedestrian bridge on the west side of the park. Temporary repairs have been made to eliminate tripping hazards, but this project constructs a long term solution to ensure safe and accessible walkways.
The goal is to restore the habitat of Lewis Park, foster long term community stewardship and bring in people from all different backgrounds to enjoy it. This project will continue the habitat restoration, provide access via trails and create areas for educational programming.
Replace playground equipment which will include play elements and access for children of all ages and abilities.
Install updated play equipment and improve access at the Lincoln Park north play area. The play equipment will include play structures and seating accessible to children of all ages and abilities and also other elements for play.
This project was selected for the second round of Parks and Green Spaces Levy Opportunity Funding. The application received in this community-initiated process is a preliminary concept and the final design may be constrained by the project budget. All projects will go through Park’s public involvement procedure which includes public meetings and community input. They will also go through an internal Parks process to ensure the most effective implementation. This project will complete the plan for opening up and improving the level area of the park. This project will also provide a needed second access to the P-Patch.
Phase Two of this project is underway. This phase will include analysis by geotechnical engineers, wetland biologists and more. In the proposed project area many environmental critical areas (ECAs) exist and were identified. These areas include: potential slope slide, steep slope, wetland, and "flood prone" areas. More research needs to be done before the trails can be located. Permitting costs will also be researched during this phase of work
This project will develop the park, which includes the Marra Farm, Seattle's largest site for urban gardening, in accordance with the Long Range Development Plan.
The scope of this project brings the play area into compliance with current play area safety standards and guideline efforts of the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) as well as meets the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
This Seattle Park District project will create a new neighborhood park. It was funded to provide the community access to open space within this high density urban neighborhood.
The Carving Shed will provide insight into distinctive varieties of Native American culture and be a place where Native carvers are safe and the public is welcome. The Shed will include a living roof and the beach will have a carved Welcome Figure.
Improvements to basketball courts, installation of benches and game tables, prep for P-Patches, rain gardens and bio-swales to address drainage, way-finding markers embedded in walking paths, and expansion of the playground.
The goal for the project is to design a park that provides shoreline/water-related experiences for all ages and abilities. The park will provide a range of passive recreational opportunities as well as shoreline restoration and habitat, small gathering areas, picnic spots, and opportunities for interpretation and education. The project also includes cleanup of site contamination, building demolition, potential partial re-use of building elements and shoreline enhancement.
This project repairs and replaces the surface at the water play feature and installs a recirculating system. The focus is to improve water conservation, safety and water play value at this park.
Replace playground equipment which will include play elements and access for children of all ages and abilities.
The goal of the project is to establish a unique green infrastructure development project transforming the Atlantic City Nursery into a working organic urban farm and demonstration wetlands restoration site.
This program is intended to satisfy the Park District Investment Initiative 2.6: Fund the renewal of existing P-Patch gardens, update aging garden infrastructure, increase accessibility, and expand essential services. This initiative fosters community building and recognizes both the importance of P-Patches as community spaces and the support needed to sustain them for everyone, including underserved and underrepresented communities. $85,000 is provided for the plan and $200,000 is provided each year for construction.
Renovation to the school district property's playground such as trails, a wetland and play structures to compliment the passive park amenities.
The project includes replacement of play equipment, replacement of the safety surfacing, and installs access and other improvements at the existing play area which was built in 1994.
The 2008 Parks and Green Spaces Levy includes $9 million to support the renovation of the Seattle Asian Art Museum (SAAM) in Volunteer Park.
The Friends of Seward Park and community supporters will work with a consultant team to lead a community engagement process to create a new torii gate to replace the one that stood at the entrance to Seward Park fifty years prior to its removal in 1986.
During the public process led by the Friends of Smith Cove Park (FoSCP) in 2015, beach volleyball was also highlighted as a potential active recreational use on this parcel. Current improvements may be limited to drainage and irrigation infrastructure to make the current field more playable. However, the long term vision is that the field be improved so that it is playable year-round and available for a variety of youth and adult sports.
This Seattle Park District project will replace playground equipment which will include play elements and access for children of all ages and abilities.
The goal is to to utilize existing public land to create a new park in the heart of Fremont. The park would be a model design of a sustainable park space and provide critical pedestrian link to other areas of Fremont, particularly bus stops and the developing neighborhood business district in northern Fremont. Proposed sustainable design features include the use of recycled materials, native plants, minimal earth movement, tree retention, storm water management, solar panels and wind turbines.
Create a multi-use community open space for public use on the south side of University Heights Center for the Community (UHCC), including a performance area/plaza, rain gardens to improve storm water quality, landscaped areas and other amenities. The design will incorporate the farmers market use on a portion of Parks property and the removal of parking from the Parks-owned portion of the site.
As included in the Parks and Green Spaces Levy language improvements to the park will include improvements to public safety including but not limited to improving sight lines into the park, renovating seating, renovating the former children's play area, improving and expanding lighting, and upgrading landscaping
Install updated play equipment and improve access to the Victory Heights Park play area. The play equipment will include play structures and seating accessible to children of all ages and abilities and also other elements for play.
This project provides a multi-use/loop trail from the intersection of East Madison through the Arboretum to the intersection of Foster Island Road and Lake Washington Boulevard. The addition of the 1.2 miles of paved multi-use trail creates a "loop" with the existing Arboretum Drive providing an accessible path for all visitors. The path will offer recreation opportunities and access to new parts of the Arboretum collection for all
This project was selected for the second round of Parks and Green Spaces Levy Opportunity Funding. The application received in this community-initiated process is a preliminary concept and the final design may be constrained by the project budget. All projects will go through Park's public involvement procedure which includes public meetings and community input. They will also go through an internal Parks process to ensure the most effective implementation.
Install updated play equipment and improve access to the Webster Park. The play equipment will include play structures and seating accessible to children of all ages and abilities and also other elements for play.
This project redevelops the previous Enterprise Car Rental site into park land that will serve the downtown businesses and residences. It may include lighting, seating, landscaping, ADA access, places for vendors, and other park elements. It will be designed to have a seamless transition between the park and the adjacent tower development. Collaboration, on grading; circulation; materials, between the Parks Department team and the tower design team for areas within the alley which is being vacated, will occur at the schematic design stage.
Develop a five senses garden by adding enhanced sight, touch and smell elements with the intent to increase accessibility and providing a welcoming atmosphere and experience for all. The Seattle Sensory Garden is an expansion of the Woodland Park Zoo Rose Garden on 1.3 acres of existing Zoo property.
The scope of this project is to develop a 1.7 acre neighborhood park that is part of the Yesler Terrace Master Planned Community. The Seattle Housing Authority will transfer ownership of this property adjacent to the Yesler Park Community Center. Parks will develop the park using 2008 Parks and Green Spaces levy funding. Yesler Terrace is being redeveloped from a low income housing development to a combination of low income housing, market rate housing, offices and community spaces. All the existing housing will be demolished and a variety of housing and building types will be built. The street grid will be partially restored.