Legislative Process

Step 1: Council Bill Introduction
Councilmembers adopt an Introduction and Referral Calendar at each regular Full Council meeting, which lists new Bills and other types of legislation that are being introduced and referred to a committee or to the Full Council for consideration. The list contains the legislative type (Bills, Resolutions, Appointments, and Clerk Files), assigned number, title, committee assignment, and sponsor of each item.
Step 2: Committee Meetings and Recommendations
Committees publish an agenda, listing items of business to be considered, for each meeting and include a Public Comment period for the public to provide feedback on those items. Committees hold required Public Hearings, review and possibly amend proposed Bills. Committee recommendations and vote on a proposed Bill are made for consideration by the Full Council.
Step 3: Final Votes
The Committee’s recommendation is presented and considered by the Full Council, where it can be accepted or amended. A Bill must pass by at least a majority vote of the City Council (or more than a majority when required by law).
Step 4: Mayoral Approval
After a Bill is passed by the City Council and signed by the Council President, it is presented to the Mayor for approval and signature. Once the Bill is signed, and unless otherwise specified, the Bill becomes effective 30 days after it is returned to the City Clerk. If the Mayor vetoes the Bill, it is sent back to the City Council for reconsideration, and the City Council may override the veto by a two-thirds vote.
Step 5: Bill Becomes law
Once a Bill is signed by the Mayor (or its veto has been overridden by the City Council), it is assigned an Ordinance number. The Ordinance is then published in the Daily Journal of Commerce, the City’s designated newspaper. When applicable, the Ordinance is then codified and sent to the codifier for publication in the Seattle Municipal Code.