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Delivering a first-rate transportation system for Seattle Scott Kubly, Director

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Seattle’s Strengths

Seattle has connected sidewalk networks and high-quality buffers in many parts of the city. It has led the nation in using traffic calming measures such as curb cuts and chicanes and uses a range of other pedestrian-oriented design strategies such as overhead pedestrian crossings signs, raised crosswalks, and accessible curb ramps. The City has an active driveway and curb ramp retrofit program to improve conditions, and new residential and commercial developments include features that encourage walking. The City has been a national leader in its use of innovative pedestrian measures, including the installation of more than 90 pedestrian “half” signals and the implementation of more road diets than any other city in the country. Seattle is also a leader in implementing policies that encourage walking, such as the 2007 Complete Streets ordinance.

Seattle is a vibrant and unique community. It is a city of neighborhoods, with mixed-use urban villages where the physical character of the community meshes well with all modes of transportation, supporting more than just automobile travel. Seattle includes the full range of land use types, including a heavily urban core with nationally recognized pedestrian destinations such as Pike Place Market. It also has an array of ongoing pedestrian-related programs such as the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) Pedestrian Program and the Safe Routes to School Program.

Seattle’s Opportunities

Curb ramp and crosswalk
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