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A vibrant Seattle through transportation excellence Interim Director, Goran Sparrman

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Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan Home
Summary
Vision & Goals
Plan Background
Planning Process
Pedestrian Policies and Programs
State of Pedestrian Environment
The Pedestrian System
- Walking in Seattle Today
- Where People Walk
- Along & Across the Roadway
Pedestrian Toolbox
Implementation
Performance Monitoring and Stewardship
Acknowledgements
Appendix
Send a Comment
SDOT Pedestrian Program
Search the Plan
Disclaimer

Where People Walk

Developing a vibrant pedestrian environment is one of the goals of the Pedestrian Master Plan. Destinations that generate pedestrian traffic such as transit stations, parks, schools, grocery stores, and libraries play a key role in creating vibrancy. However, not all destinations generate the same levels of pedestrian activity.

The pedestrian demand methodology tells us where people walk by providing a measure of the potential for pedestrian activity in an area. Pedestrian demand is determined by the presence of pedestrian attractors and generators and includes population and employment forecasts for 2025. The pedestrian demand assessment identifies existing destinations such as parks, schools, and libraries that are likely to attract pedestrians and identifies “hot spots” where pedestrian destinations are located near one another

However, not all destinations generate the same levels of pedestrian activity. For example, a regional transit station is likely to generate more pedestrian traffic than a local bus stop. Multi-family residential buildings and regional destinations such as the Pike Place Market are likely to generate more pedestrian activity than low density office and retail uses. In addition, the distances people are willing to walk to and from different types of destinations vary. For example, people may be more likely to walk farther to a transit station than to a coffee shop. Examples of high, medium, and low pedestrian generators are shown below.

The purpose of the demand methodology is to provide a practical tool for making relative comparisons of pedestrian conditions throughout Seattle, both today and in the future. This information is then mapped to inform the vision for a long-term pedestrian system and encourage objective, targeted, and strategic decisions about pedestrian improvements. The Pedestrian Demand Map shows where pedestrians are expected to be throughout Seattle.

High Pedestrian Generators

university or college
university or college

apartments, condos, mixed use
apartments, condos, mixed use

regional attraction: park or museum
regional attraction: park or museum

major bus stop (5+ routes) or light rail station
major bus stop (5+ routes) or light rail station

Medium Pedestrian Generators

school
school

grocery store
grocery store

shared use trail
shared use trail

libraries, community centers, social services
libraries, community centers, social services

Low Pedestrian Generators

stairs
stairs

local retail
local retail

bridges/overpasses
bridges/overpasses

local bus stop
local bus stop

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