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A vibrant Seattle through transportation excellence Interim Director, Goran Sparrman

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Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan Home
Summary
Vision & Goals
Plan Background
Planning Process
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State of Pedestrian Environment
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Mission

Make Seattle the Most Walkable City in the Nation

A walkable city is a place where people walk because walking is convenient, fun, and a healthy choice. People choose to walk to get to nearby places and to greet their neighbors. Walkable cities share common elements:

"I want my kids to feel free to explore their environment, love their community, and explore the world around them."

- Seattle resident

  • Enjoyable space to walk on every street, such as a walkway, a trail, or a shared space that invites walking;
  • Well-maintained pedestrian facilities that are easy to navigate for all;
  • Destinations within walking distance that allow people to live close to many different types of shops, schools, jobs, services, and parks;
  • Walkable connections to transit to provide access to destinations that are beyond walking distance; and
  • Places of respite that invite casual conversation, encourage connection with nature, and provide places to play.

In a walkable city, the pedestrian realm is attractive—whether it be a street tree turning colors in the fall, an interesting detail in a facade or on a walkway, a sidewalk café that bubbles with laughter, an inviting display in a shop window, or the smile on the face of a passerby.

Walkable cities invite people to explore, to experience people and places first-hand, and to use their feet to connect with their culture.

Kids at play

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