2015 RSJI Speaker Series

RSJI Speakers Series

The RSJI Speaker Series brings thoughtful, provocative and powerful speakers from across the country to Seattle to speak on the racial equity issues of today.

The theme for 2015 is The World We Want Now. All of our speakers share their deep knowledge and experience fighting for racial justice that make it possible for us to live in a world without racism and oppression; the world we want now.

All events are free and open to the public. Tickets are not required.

Kimberlé Crenshaw

Annual Human Rights Day Celebration — Black Lives Matter

December 10, 2015, 7:00 pm
Town Hall Seattle
1119 8th Ave, Seattle, WA 98101

The event is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required.
Please join us for a reception starting at 6:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served.


Kimberlé Crenshaw teaches Civil Rights and other courses in critical race studies and constitutional law. Her primary scholarly interests center around race and the law, and she was a founder and has been a leader in the intellectual movement called Critical Race Theory. She was elected Professor of the Year by the 1991 and 1994 graduating classes. She now splits her time each year between UCLA and the Columbia School of Law.

At the University of Wisconsin Law School, where she received her LL.M., Professor Crenshaw was a William H. Hastie Fellow. She then clerked for Justice Shirley Abrahamson of the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

Professor Crenshaw's publications include Critical Race Theory (edited by Crenshaw, et al., 1995) and Words that Wound: Critical Race Theory, Assaultive Speech and the First Amendment (with Matsuda, et al., 1993).

In 2007, Professor Crenshaw was awarded the Fulbright Chair for Latin America in Brazil. In 2008, she was nominated an Alphonse Fletcher Fellow. In the same year she joined the selective group of scholars awarded with an in-residence fellowship at the Center of Advanced Behavioral Studies at Stanford.

You can find out more about Professor Crenshaw's work through her think tank, The African American Policy Forum.


This event is accessible; ASL interpretation provided.
To request an accommodation for a disability:
Call 206-684-4540 or email marta.idowu@seattle.gov.

This information is available in other formats on request.


RSJI Speakers Series - Kimberlé Crenshaw

Fania Davis

Understanding the Intersection of Restorative and Racial Justice

November 12, 2015, 6:30 pm
Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute
104 17th Ave. S., Seattle 98144

The event is free and open to the public. Please join us for a casual reception starting at 5:30 pm. Light refreshments will be served.


Fania Davis is a founder and current Director of RJOY (Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth). She has been active for many decades in the civil rights, Black liberation, women’s, prisoners’, peace, anti-racial violence and anti-apartheid movements.

Founded in 2005, RJOY focuses on reducing racial disparities by promoting restorative approaches that engage families, communities, and systems. Beginning in 2007, RJOY’s West Oakland Middle School pilot project eliminated violence and expulsions, and reduced suspension rates by 87%.


This event is accessible; ASL interpretation provided.
To request an accommodation for a disability:
Call 206-684-5845 or email gabriella.sanchez-stern@seattle.gov.

This information is available in other formats on request.


RSJI Speakers Series - Fania Davis

Indigenous Peoples’ Day

October 12, 2015, 11:30 am – 1:30 pm
Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Ave.
Bertha Knight Landes Room

To honor Seattle’s Indigenous People’s Day on the 2nd Monday in October, you are invited to attend a lunchtime event at Seattle City Hall, featuring guest speaker Winona LaDuke, Native American activist, environmentalist and author.

The event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided.


Winona LaDuke is the Executive Director of the White Earth Land Recovery Project and Honor the Earth, where she works on a national level to raise public support, and create funding for frontline native environmental groups. She is an Anishinaabekwe (Ojibwe) enrolled member of the Mississippi Band Anishinaabeg, who lives and works on the White Earth Reservations. At the age of 18, she spoke in front of the United Nations and since has become one of the most prominent voices for American Indian economic and environmental concerns. A graduate of Harvard and Antioch Universities, LaDuke has written extensively on Native American and environmental issues. She is the author of six books.


This event is accessible; ASL interpretation provided.
To request an accommodation for a disability:
Call 206-684-4540 or email marta.idowu@seattle.gov.

This information is available in other formats on request.


RSJI Speakers Series - Winona LaDuke