Rejuvenate Our P-Patches

Updated: January 26, 2017

Open Budget

Find out more about funding and timelines on our Open Budget site.


This program is intended to satisfy the Park District Investment Initiative 2.6:

Fund the renewal of existing P-Patch gardens, update aging garden infrastructure, increase accessibility, and expand essential services. This initiative fosters community building and recognizes both the importance of P-Patches as community spaces and the support needed to sustain them for everyone, including underserved and underrepresented communities. The Seattle Park District provides $85,000 for the plan and $200,000 is provided each year for construction.

Download the P-Patch Rejuvenation Initiative Plan

What was the first step?

Planning: Winter 2015 – Spring 2016 Completed

  • The consultant team was led by Barker Landscape Architects, with Karen Braitmayer, nationally known expert in ADA and Matt Dressler from Mountains to Sound GIS.
  • P-Patch staff from the Department of Neighborhoods, Seattle Park and Recreation (SPR) and P-Patch site leaders provided the consultant background information. They researched and mapped demographics, created a scoring sheet for 91 site visits (all the P Patches), developed criteria options and drafted GIS maps showing underserved and underrepresented areas. This information was reviewed by SPR and P-Patch staff.
  • A report was developed that assesses the condition of all P-Patch community gardens and, working with SPR and P-Patch staff, identify major maintenance needs.
  • The assessment was developed using information gathered, analyzed and organized into a matrix. Assessment criteria are as follows:
    • Infrastructure
    • Neighborhood Demographics
    • Accessibility
    • Gardener Capacity
    • Safety and Security
    • Physical Characteristics
  • Staff and the consultant examined priority locations in order to choose five for design and construction in 2016.

What work happened in 2016?

Five P-Patches were selected for improvements:

  • Estelle Street P-Patch: The primary issue at this P-Patch was the lack of consistent water for the gardeners. This project added a designated water main and service for the gardeners. Before this, the gardeners had long periods of time in the summer when they had to bring their own water.  SPR, SPU, SDOT and DON contributed to the success of this work.
  • Thomas Street P-Patch: The primary issues were safety, security and accessibility.  The north end of the P-Patch was redesigned.
    • In order to make the P-Patch safer, the new design created a more open space and the shed was relocated to eliminate hiding spaces.  An eight-foot fence was added to the north side of the garden. This satisfies all the tenets of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED).
    • To make the site more accessible, the shed was replaced and the patio repaved. The shed now is accessible to all gardeners.
  • New Holly Power Garden: Add fence and gates - this is basic P-Patch infrastructure.
  • Squire Park: Nine hose bibs were relocated, in 2017, the gathering area will be made accessible from the sidewalk and the gate and fence repaired.
  • Jackson Park: The project moved nine hose bibs out of the pathway, created ADA compliant pathways and a gathering area with compliant picnic table.

What are the next steps for 2017?

Design: Spring 2017

  • The consultant will prepare schematic designs for the five sites. This will prioritize the sites and help to determine which projects (from the ten) are too difficult, expensive or run the risk of being less valuable investments.
  • Work with P-Patch community garden coordinators and garden leads.
  • Improvements will be made to five P-Patches.

Construction: Summer – Fall 2017

What will happen in 2018–2021?

  • Seattle Parks and Recreation and P-Patch representatives will meet annually to select projects for each following year.
  • Information that has not been added directly into the current assessment will be organized so that it can be used in subsequent years if desired.