Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90Seattle City Light 2015 Annual Report THE CITY OF SEATTLE—CITY LIGHT DEPARTMENT NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AS OF AND FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2015 AND 2014 - 26 - The Department’s customer base accounted for electric energy sales at December 31, 2015 and 2014, as follows: 2015 2014 Residential 35.9 % 36.1 % Nonresidential 64.1 % 63.9 % Total 100.0 % 100.0 % Revenues earned in the process of delivering energy to customers, wholesale energy transactions, and related activities are considered operating revenues in the determination of change in net position. Investment income, nonexchange transactions, and other revenues are considered Nonoperating revenues. Expense Recognition—Expenses incurred in the process of delivering energy to customers, wholesale energy transactions, and related activities are considered operating expenses in the determination of net income. Debt interest expense, debt related amortization, and certain other expenses are considered Nonoperating expenses. Administrative and General Overhead Costs Applied—Certain administrative and general overhead costs are allocated to construction work-in-progress, major data processing systems development, programmatic conservation, relicensing mitigation projects, and billable operations and maintenance activities based on rates established by cost studies. Pension and benefit costs are allocated to capital and operations and maintenance activities based on a percentage of labor dollars. The administrative and general overhead costs applied totaled $52.1 million and $48.1 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively. Pension and benefit costs were $58.7 million and $52.6 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively. Administrative and general expenses, net of total applied overhead, were $92.1 million and $75.8 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively. Interest Charged to Construction—Interest is charged for funds used during construction of plant assets and to non-billable construction work-in-progress. Interest charged represents the estimated costs of financing construction projects and is computed using the Department’s weighted-average interest rate for all bonds outstanding, the majority of which are tax exempt, and is revised when new bonds are issued and at the end of the year. Interest charged to construction totaled $8.9 million and $5.8 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively, and is reflected as a reduction of Interest expense in the statements of revenues, expenses, and changes in net position. Nonexchange Transactions—Capital contributions and grants in the amount of $44.0 million and $32.2 million are reported for 2015 and 2014, respectively, in the statements of revenues, expenses, and changes in net position as nonoperating revenues from nonexchange transactions. Capital contributions and grants revenues are recognized based on the accrual basis of accounting. In-kind capital contributions are recognized at estimated fair value in the period when all eligibility requirements have been met as described in GASB Statement No. 33, Accounting and Financial Reporting for Nonexchange Transactions. Federal and state grant revenues are recognized as earned and are subject to contract and other compliance audits. Compensated Absences—Regular employees of the Department earn vacation time in accordance with length of service. A maximum of 480 hours may be accumulated for the most tenured employees and, 26