Responding to Gender-Based Violence
Responding to Gender-Based Violence

Responding to Gender-Based Violence

The City of Seattle believes that residents deserve the right enjoy the peace of mind that is only available when our homes are free from the threat of violence. The City is also working to ensure victims of sexual assault and commercial sexual exploitation are provided the relevant information and resources they need to escape and recover from abuse.  We invest in programs that help victims and survivors create safe and violence-free lives, and heal from the trauma of abuse or sexual assault.

To achieve this, the Mayor's Office on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault invests more than $5.2 million in community organizations that address domestic violence, sexual assault and commercial sexual exploitation through prevention, intervention, coordinated response, and offenders' accountability programs.The Mayor's Office on Domestic Violence also leads several initiatives including the Domestic Violence Prevention Council and the City of Seattle-Coordinated Effort Against Sexual Exploitation (CEASE) with the goal of convening elected leaders, City departments and community partners to reduce domestic violence and address sexual exploitation.Understanding that many Seattle speak English as a second language, the Office created the Multilingual Access Project which provides a wide range of information including how to get out of immediate danger and find safe housing in 13 languages.  Victims are also able to call the Peace in the Home Helpline, a 24/7 line which connects victims to advocates that speak 14 languages.  In October 2015, Mayor's Office on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault joined Clear Channel Outdoor to unveil a campaign in five languages-English, Spanish, Amharic, Vietnamese and Somali-to combat domestic violence in Seattle.

In April 2015, the MODVSA joined Clear Channel Outdoor to unveil a campaign to combat child sex trafficking in Seattle and King County.Mayor  Ed Murray issued a proclamation in recognition Human Trafficking Awareness Month in January 2016.

Gender-Based Violence Outreach and Prevention Excerpt
Supportive Victims Services Excerpt
Offender Accountability and Systems Improvement Excerpt
Access to Advocacy Excerpt