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News from the Office of Film + Music
Vol. 5, No. 23
November 9-15, 2011

CITY NEWS

LOCAL ARTIST PLAY IN-STUDIO ON THIS WEEK'S ART ZONE
SEATTLE CHANNEL
This week on Art Zone, local music takes center stage. The Moondoggies, a local a quartet of talented musicians reminiscent of northwest indie-folk sounds, play the Art Zone studio and even unveil a brand new tune. Ben Verellen, renowned for his popular personally-crafted amplifiers, is also profiled. It all airs this Friday at 8 on Seattle Channel 21.

INDUSTRY NEWS AND UPDATES

FILMMAKERS: SUBMIT YOUR SHORT FILM TO SPOKANE REEL FESTIVAL
REEL SPOKANE
Reel Spokane is a community-focused organization aimed at collecting and showing locally developed film. This month, they are calling all filmmakers, new and veteran, to submit a short film to their annual film festival. All entries must have been completed in the Inland Northwest after November 1, 2010. The deadline for entries is November 18.

FILM ENTHUSIASTS INVITED TO HAPPY HOUR AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM
NORTHWEST FILM FORUM
Join rich conversations and creative minds at the Northwest Film Forum's monthly Third Thursday Happy Hour Saloon. The gathering, which kicks off November 17th, occurs on the third Thursday of every month and brings filmmakers and film lovers together in one space.

EMP MARKETING DEPARTMENT ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR DESIGN INTERN
EMP MUSEUM
EMP is seeking smart, outgoing and creative Design Interns to be an integral part of their Marketing and Audience Development group. MThis position is unpaid and requires a minimum of 15 hours/week. Students may intern for college credit or for professional growth and enrichment. Candidates should submit a cover letter, resume and two design samples to internships@empmuseum.org, specifying "Design Internship" in the subject and describing how the position matches the candidate's qualifications and goals in the cover letter.

A HISTORY OF COUNTRY MUSIC IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST
NO DEPRESSION
You may not have guessed it, but Country has deep roots here in Seattle. Just like the rise of Jazz and Cajun, Country music was imported to the northwest by early players of the genre. The "Wild West" atmosphere of the Pacific Northwest beckoned newcomers, and as they came their music and culture followed. No Depression takes a deep, story-like look at the beginnings and rise of our very own Country scene.

FREE GUITAR LESSONS AT NEPTUNE THEATRE
SEATTLE THEATER GROUP
As part of their ongoing grand reopening celebration, The Neptune theatre has provided various music lessons for anyone interested, free of charge. On Saturday November 12th, well known guitarist, composer and teacher Michael Powers will offer a free guitar lesson. All that is required is an acoustic guitar. No reservation is necessary for this age 12+ event.

NORTHWEST FILM CENTER CELEBRATES 38TH ANNUAL NORTHWEST FILMMAKERS FESTIVAL
NORTHWEST FILM CENTER
Portland's Northwest Film Center presents the 38th annual Northwest Filmmakers' Festival this fall to highlight the outstanding film work being produced in the prolific Pacific Northwest. This year's event showcases over 40 short and feature films from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and BC, as well as several panel discussions and workshops. NWFC is also celebrating its 40th anniversary this November, kicking off the festival with a birthday party on opening night, Friday, November 11th

SIFF CELEBRATES ITALIAN CINEMA AT THE UPTOWN
SIFF CINEMA
Co-presented by Seattle-Perugia Sister City Association, Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF) will honor our Italian friends in the Third Annual Seattle Italian Film Festival. An array of Italy's best new cinema will be exhibited at Uptown Theatre next Wednesday through Sunday. With a total of 13 screenings, the festival is sure to be eccellentissimo.


FIRST ANNUAL SEATTLE SHORTS FILM FESTIVAL HAPPENS THIS WEEKEND
FLAVOR PILL
A showcase of short films will take over the Grand Illusion Cinema this Saturday, marking the First Annual Seattle Shorts Film Festival. Featuring animated films, dramas, comedies and everything in between, this film festival was designed to bring the freshest and most brilliant films to enthusiasts in Seattle.


HELP "KICKSTART" SEATTLE FILM AND MUSIC PROJECTS

Kickstarter is an online "crowd-funding" resource that helps musicians, filmmakers and producers of artistic projects reach out to friends and fans for financial support. Kickstarter allows artists the opportunity to give back to funders with special rewards, such as an exclusive album pre-release, a producer credit in a film, or even getting to meet the artist in person. Seattle is a hotbed for film and music projects, and you can be a pivotal part of the production process by backing a project and spreading the word. Current Seattle-based Kickstarter projects are listed below ordered by time remaining. Click on the Kickstarter buttons to check out these local projects and discover even more happening around Seattle.

Legion of Sparrows Debut Album - November 11th (2 days)

John Oven: Over 'Master's (the) Past' - 7 inch - November 12th (13days)

Natalie Live Music Project - November 15th (6 days)

The Janelle Burris EP Project - November 22nd (13 days)

THIS IS OURS: Post Production (feature film shot on the RED) - November 18th (8 days)

The making of Dust & Gold.... - November 26th (17 days)

The Cinemascope EPs - November 30th (21 days)

The Barefoot Bandit Documentary - December 9th (29 days)

Welcome To Doe Bay - December 10th (31 days)

David Guilbault - Recording a Songwriter's Body of Work - December 19th (40 days)


TOP 10 NW MUSIC FOR WEEK OF 11/9-11/15
Office of Film + Music
Compiled from figures at Sonic Boom (Ballard and Capitol Hill) and Easy Street (West Seattle and Queen Anne).

  1. Pickwick -"Myths"
  2. Head & The Heart - "s/t"
  3. Various Artists - "Live at KEXP, Volume 7"
  4. Pearl Jam - "Pearl Jam Twenty"
  5. Eddie Vedder - "Ukulele Songs"
  6. Nirvana - "Nevermind"
  7. Brite Futures - "Dark Past"
  8. Shelby Earl - "Burn the Boats"/li>
  9. Screaming Trees - "Last Words: The Final Recordings
  10. Fleet Foxes - "Helplessness Blues"


FILM PRODUCTION OF THE WEEK
This column highlights the amazing artistic efforts of our local filmmaking community and the broad positive economic impact it has on our region. This week we profile:

Night Zero
NIGHT ZERO

Night Zero is a photographic novel that blends comic books, film, and the zombie apocalypse into a new form of visual art. Their unique graphic novels follow the survivors of Seattle's zombie outbreak, but instead of illustrations the team at Night Zero uses on-location photography to depict their adventures. Now in its fourth and final year of production, Night Zero has done photo shoots all over Seattle, featuring more than four hundred contributors over its lifetime. The team has produced dozens of shoots in both public and private locations around the city, and have self-published three collected volumes to support their efforts.

"Seattle has been a wonderful location to host the zombie apocalypse of Night Zero, not only for its diversity of scenery and locations, but for the incredible network of talented actors and crew," says Night Zero creator and director Anthony van Winkle. "Shooting everything on location, without ever a green-screen or digital backdrop, has really brought us a new perspective on this beautiful city."

Night Zero has worked with dozens Washington State crew and businesses over the last four years, and has featured more than a hundred Washington State cast. Numerous familiar landmarks and locations are visible into the photographs, as the story and characters are proudly placed in Seattle.

SCARECROW ON SEATTLE
Scarecrow
In appreciation and recognition of Seattle's long and illustrious film history, we are proud to partner with Scarecrow Video to bring you weekly reviews of historical Seattle films. Each week we will showcase a new movie, with special emphasis on how these films show Seattle's most filmable locations.

Things That Aren't Here Anymore (1995)

As someone who can spend hours on vintageseattle.org or flipping through Clark Humphrey's Vanishing Seattle, I was thrilled to discover this gem in Scarecrow's Seattle Interest section. The program, produced by KCTS Channel 9, features ordinary Northwest residents sharing memories of some key places and things from our city's past. It begins at Fifth and Pine at premiere department store Fredrick & Nelson. Former employees paint a picture of the tea room, where Seattle's high society ladies came to sip and be seen while fashion shows paraded past-very George Cukor's The Women. A window designer reveals that the live reindeer in the Christmas displays would shed in the heat, leaving workers to glue the fur back on to the animals. Jealousy coursed through my veins as residents described the elevator-like sensation they got riding the city's cable cars. You could ride them from Fauntleroy to Downtown and up to the U-District before they were dismantled in the '40s. Wallace Aiken describes how he and a youthful mob ambushed the last cable car run up the Queen Anne Counterbalance. While he's talking, a montage of photos of the hill shows the Harry W. Treat Residence on Highland Drive and a few other buildings still around today. Speaking of transportation, a Kalakala ferry captain says that while the silver slug's design was futuristic, the craft was, "almost a complete failure in function," so much so that you had to hold on to your coffee or the ships' vibrations would send it down the counter. There are many shots of the ferry out on Elliott Bay that feature the growing Seattle skyline. The stories then move south, starting at Sick's Seattle Stadium on Rainier Avenue at McClellan Street. The home of the Seattle Rainiers baseball team (and later the Seattle Pilots) regularly sold out its 17,000 seats, plus the gawkers camped out on "Tightwad Hill," located on the farm beyond the outfield wall. I giggled when a group of elderly ladies talked about how attractive all the players were, including star pitcher Fred Hutchinson. Musician Dave Lewis reminisces about dancing and "catching" girls at Bird Land at 22nd Avenue and East Madison Street. A Seattle Times writer recollects about Ruby Chow's restaurant at Broadway & Jackson, where reporters and cops got boozy and sampled whatever Chinese delicacies Ruby put in front of them. The program wraps up with the Green Lake Aqua Show, where in the '50s and early '60s you could watch musical theater and the now lost art of comedic diving. Careful viewers may recognize some of the footage from the opening sequence of Almost Live!'s earlier seasons. Afterwards, I couldn't help but think of all the other Seattle landmarks that have disappeared since 1995-The Kingdome, The Fun Forest, Sunset Bowl, and so on. But I found myself teary-eyed when I realized many of the interviewees probably aren't with us anymore, either. Thanks to this program, their stories will be a part of our city's history forever. -Jen Koogler

MEDIA DIGEST

LOCAL BANDS ENTERTAIN SEATTLE INTERACTIVE CONFERENCE ATTENDEES
SEATTLE PI
Hometown bands Mudhoney, Shabazz Palaces, Presidents of the United States of America, and Death Cab for Cutie all performed during last week's Seattle Interactive Conference. The 2-day conference yielded over 3,500 attendees at several venues. The Seattle setting for the conference is a "natural destination" for discussions about film, music and the digital world.


NEPTUNE THEATER FLOURISHES AS CONCERT VENUE
THE SEATTLE TIMES
The recently renovated Neptune Theatre has hung up its movie-theater legacy and adopted a new look underscored by music. The theatre, after months of renovations updating the 90-year old space, will now be synonymous with music and performances as well as cinema. Despite the big transformation, concert-goers seem to be responding positively, noting that "it's very intimate [and] you are not very far away from the stage." The Neptune also offers free public tours the third Saturday of every month, so curious music aficionados have a sneak peak before a concert.


HOW MUSIC HELPED SEATTLE GET THROUGH TOUGH TIMES
CROSSCUT
When the economy takes a dive, morale will inevitably follow. History has proven more than once that music and the arts are key to getting out of a collective despair. When Boeing was hit with a cut forcing them to fire tens of thousands of employees, the end of the Seattle world seemed imminent for some. The Mayor at the time, Wes Uhlman, decided he needed to make a move to add some "life and vitality" to the city during hard economic times. The arts festival he initiated grew to become what we know as Bumbershoot, a festival that Seattleites look forward to every year. Crosscut's article gives many more examples of how Rock and Roll may have saved Seattle.


JACK ENDINO RECOUNTS RECORDING MUDHONEY'S FIRST SUB POP SINGLE
MIX ONLINE
Producer Jack "The Godfather of Grunge" Endino took a break from answering questions about recording Nirvana's first album to talk about Mudhoney's 1988 debut Sub Pop single with MIX Online's "Classic Tracks." The single was recorded at Endino and Chris Hanzsek's Reciprocal Recording studio in Fremont. Although Endino calls Reciprocal "a horrible place to record," the studio was home for many classic recordings before closing in 1991.


IN SEARCH OF NIRVANA
HAARETZ
Last month marked the 20th anniversary of the release of "Nevermind," Nirvana's second studio album. The occasion inspired a slew of retrospective looking at the early 1990s, the so called "golden age of grunge," a time when record companies were rich enough to take small bands from nowhere towns and morph them into international rock stars. But here, in a region where it rains most days of the year, people choose to focus on the roots of Nirvana and on the underground cultural infrastructure from which it sprang. In an interview with Jacob McMurray, Curator at EMP, he points out: "These bands did not consider themselves grunge. In interviews from the period they style themselves rock, punk rock or punk bands. For the fans who got to know this music in 1992, it is simply grunge - that was the way to refer to all these bands together," he explains. "Which is also fine. But contrary to the way people have thought, Nirvana did not come out of nowhere. The punk scene in Seattle developed over the course of 15 years, and then, suddenly, radio stations were exposed to it. The music video of 'Smells Like Teen Spirit' helped a lot, but that was not where everything started."

QUICK LINKS
OFFICE OF FILM + MUSIC BLOG
CITY OF MUSIC
SEATTLE CHANNEL
BUSINESS SERVICE PORTAL
FMI HAPPY HOUR

Seattle Office of Film + Music Staff
James Keblas, Director
Chris Swenson, Film Program Coordinator
Rachel White, Music + Nightlife Program Coordinator
Sorayya Aminian, Intern
Sam Veatch, Intern

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