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Film + Music Newsletter 9/26/2007


INDUSTRY NEWS AND UPDATES
MEDIA INC. ANNOUNCES NEW BLOG, ONLINE EDITION AND MORE
Media Inc. is proud to announce the unveiling of the Northwest Production Index blog, a new resource for the regional film and video industry. Aiming to create enhanced communication among industry professionals and a greater sense of community, the new blog allows members of the local production community to send in contributions and comment on posted content. Media Inc. is also proud to announce the relaunch of the digital edition of Media Inc. magazine. Job lines are also now available on the Northwest Production Index site. We invite both prospective employers and employees to post job-related information online, absolutely free of charge. For more information on any of these programs vist the Northwest Index Website.
SOUND OFF: BATTLE OF THE UNDERAGE BANDS, CALL FOR ENTRIES
In 2008, EMP|SFM will present the seventh annual Sound Off!, the Northwest's largest underage battle of the bands competition. If you are age 21 or under and play rock, hip-hop, electronic, pop or any other kind of music, this is your chance to Sound Off! at EMP|SFM! Past participants include Schoolyard Heroes, The Lonely H, Capitol Basement and Natalie Portman's Shaved Head, to name a few. With a judging staff comprised of movers and shakers of the Seattle music scene, this competition is a great chance for local, young bands to kick-start their music careers!
NFFTY SEARCHES FOR DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT FOR FILM FESTIVAL
The National Film Festival for Talented Youth, is seeking a Director of Development/Fund Developer to start immediately. NFFTY is a new national youth film festival based in Seattle. It's poised to become the largest and most influential film festival and support organization for filmmakers under 21. After a very successful kick off screening last April, NFFTY is launching fully March 2008 with a 3 day festival at the Seattle Center.
STARBUCKS GIVING AWAY FREE ITUNES DOWNLOADS
For 37 straight days beginning next week, Starbucks will give away free iTunes music downloads, including songs by Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell and Paul McCartney, to kick off a new partnership between the coffee titan and Apple Inc. Up to 1.5 million daily giveaways will begin Oct. 2 and run through Nov. 7 at more than 10,000 company-owned and licensed U.S. stores, Starbucks said. When the promotion ends, Starbucks expects to have given away more than 50 million songs.
SEATTLE LESBIAN AND GAY FILM FESTIVAL PROGRAM LAUNCH EVENT
Dying to know what's on the program this year? You're not alone, and reps from Three Dollar Bill Cinema, the festival's sponsor, will be happy to walk you through the promising lineup (including the opening-night feature, "The Walker," starring Woody Harrelson and written and directed by Paul Schrader) at this preview event. There'll be clips from festival films as well as a viewing of the festival trailer, likely to follow in the footsteps of past trailers in its sassy, provocative greatness.
SEATTLE OPERA YOUNG ARTIST PROGRAM CELEBRATES TEN YEARS!
Seattle Opera has achieved an international reputation not only for the compelling performances produced by the company, but also for its far-reaching an innovative educational programs. In the last ten years, Seattle Opera has produced up to 250 educational events aimed to reach audiences of all ages. By inviting people to share in free lectures, pre-performance talks, and exhilarating recitals, Seattle Opera continues to engage a growing community. As Education Director Perry Lorenzo explains, "There's no age limit on becoming an opera fan."
SIFF GROUP APPOINTS DAVID HEURTEL AS CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER
The Seattle International Film Festival Group is proud to announce the appointment of David Heurtel as Chief Marketing Officer. In this role, Heurtel will oversee the Development, Communications, and Membership departments for SIFF Group.

Credited with bringing SIFF Cinema and the VERA Project to the Seattle Center, Heurtel's impact in the non-profit arts community has been exceptional. In addition to his success in growing programs, Heurtel was responsible for marketing, communications and sponsorship development at the Center. "This is an exciting and transformative time at SIFF. I'm eager to help the organization move forward in creating and realizing its long-term strategic goals," Heurtel says about his new position at SIFF.
SLAM FESTIVAL STARTS TOMORROW
Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with three nights of contemporary Latin-American works on the forefront of modern classical music at the SLAM festival. The Seattle Latin-American Music festival will present chamber music by composers hailing from Argentina, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico, and Puerto Rico, and feature visiting and local performers Sept. 27-29. The festival will be kicked off with a talk by Snchez-Gutirrez, and followed by pre-concert discussions with the artists led by Gavin Borchert of the Seattle Weekly, and Chris DeLaurenti of The Stranger.
NWFF'S LOCAL SIGHTINGS FILM FESTIVAL A MERE WEEK AWAY
Northwest Film Forum's premiere showcase of Northwest filmmaking is back and bigger than ever. The festiva, which happens on the NWFF's theaters in Seattle, features great prizes, filmmaker parties, archival Northwest films and an impressive ntation film industry jury looking for strong Northwest work. The annual festival includes both feature film presentations as well as short film programs and special events with live film performances, installation art, audience participation and parties. This year's festival takes place in the cinemas of Northwest Film Forum from October 4-11.
SEATTLE FILM INSTITUTE OPEN HOUSE
The Seattle Film Institute offers full and part-time classes in Filmmaking, Screenwriting, Film History, Documentary Filmmaking, and Digital Video - as well as a Summer Teen Filmmaking Program. Fall classes start in October. An Open House for the Seattle Film Institute's fall classes will be held Saturday, October 6, from 11 AM - 1 PM at the Seattle Film Institute: 1709 23rd Avenue, Seattle, WA, 98122.
BILL AND MELINDA GATES FOUNDATION SEEKS PROGRAM OFFICER FOR PACIFIC NORTHWEST PROGRAMS
The Program Officer will be responsible for working with the PNW team to drive the foundation's grant making, and implementation of programs, particularly those focusing on youth. This person will collaborate with members of the existing Pacific Northwest team, working together to achieve PNW program goals. This is a temporary full-time position, replacing a staff person on leave for the period of Mid-December 2007 through the end of May, 2008. This Program Officer will manage an existing set of grants to youth services organizations, and develop new grants to be made in Q1 and Q2 of 2008.
A DRINK FOR THE KIDS BEGINS ON SEPTEMBER 29TH
This one's for the 21+ folks... come out to the music industry's annual weeklong benefit for the Vera Project. Tip your glasses at venues all over Seattle with a grand finale concert at the elegant Triple Door.
POLICE BREAK UP BRAWL AT CHUCK E. CHEESE
Police were called to break up a weekend fight among a rowdy group of teenage girls at the family-themed pizza restaurant, Chuck E. Cheese. The more than a dozen girls, between 13 and 16 years old, went berserk in the restaurant's lobby Saturday night, police said. Witnesses said the fight erupted with two girls using profanities near the front entrance and ended with several girls involved in a physical fight. The group had apparently been dropped off and left alone at the restaurant, known for its singing and dancing animatronic rodents. Assistant Police Chief Alfred Sexton said the incident wasn't the first time Chuck E. Cheese was nearly overrun by unruly teens.
SEATTLE SCHOOL BOARD CANDIDATES FORUM
The third biennial Seattle School Board Candidates Forum is part of the continuing efforts of the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs and Seattle Arts Commission Education Committee to promote increased arts education opportunities for all Seattle public school students. With a new superintendent at Seattle Public Schools and four of seven school board positions up for election, this is an important time of change for the district. We encourage all who care about excellent public schools in our city to turn out and hear from these candidates. The Forum will be held Monday, October 15, 2007 at the Children's Theatre with refreshments being served at 5:30 and the froum starting at 6:30. For more information vist or call the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs at arts.culture@seattle.gov or (206) 684-7171
TOP 10 NW MUSIC FOR THE WEEK OF 9/17-9/23
Compiled from figures at Sonic Boom (Ballard, Fremont, and Capitol Hill) and Easy Street (West Seattle and Queen Anne).
  1. Eddie Vedder - Into the Wild
  2. Schoolyard Heroes - Abominations
  3. New Pornographers - Challengers
  4. Various Artist - Live at KEXP Vol. 3
  5. Minus the Bear - Planet of Ice
  6. Kinski - Down Below It's Chaos
  7. Blue Scholars - Bayani
  8. Ann Wilson - Hope & Glory
  9. Band of Horses - Everything All the Time
  10. Pink Martini - Hey Eugene!
WALT CROWLEY, 1947-2007: KEEPER OF LOCAL HISTORY
Walt Crowley, a political commentator and former City Council candidate who co-founded one of the nation's finest regional history Web sites, died Friday after complications following a stroke. He was 60. Friday afternoon, family and friends gathered at the hospital and over the phone in an impromptu memorial to share stories about the wiry, opinionated, outspoken historian and former left-wing journalist who got first his job in Seattle city government by protesting that same bureaucracy.
MEDIA DIGEST
REVERBFEST FOCUSES PURELY ON LOCAL BANDSREVERBFEST FOCUSES PURELY ON LOCAL BANDS
Seattle Weekly will be hosting a nine-stage local music showcase in Ballard on October 6th. Local up-and-comers, The Pleasureboaters and Tacocat will be performing, as well as mainstays, the Dusty 45s and Girl Trouble. Four stages will be all-ages, everything starts at 2PM.



THE MUSIC SCENE IS HUGE-PROVIDED YOU'RE OLD ENOUGH TO DRINK. BUT UNDERAGE MUSIC FANS DO HAVE OPTIONS
Whether you come from the teenage drinking paradises of Canada or just the more lenient of these United States (say, Texas), you'll no doubt be surprised by the old-timey prohibitions of the Washington State Liquor Control Board. While it's now legal for bars to host all-ages shows in Seattle-thanks to a repeal of the city's odious Teen Dance Ordinance some years ago-it's still not financially attractive for most places to do so. For a brief list of all-ages nightlife options, visit the link above.
PLUCK, LUCK CARRIED WASHINGTON NATIVE FULLER TO "PUSHING DAISIES"
At a computer dotted with action figures and surrounded by the "Addams Family Values" soundtrack music, Clarkston, Washington native, Bryan Fuller created the most original, should-be-a-hit new TV show of the fall. After dropping out of USC, because he couldn't afford it, Fuller began writing for Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Voyager. Now, a year after working on "Heroes" as co-executive producer and writer - "He's got such a unique voice, and he was key in developing some of the humor in the show," show creator Tim Kring said in a recent interview - Fuller's launched his third quirky, dark and visually arresting show, "Pushing Daisies." It premieres at 8 p.m. Oct. 3 on KOMO/ABC.
SPOTLIGHT: SOUND EFFECTS
Walking into Scott Colburn's Gravelvoice recording studio, a renovated 1908 church in Ballard, feels like stepping into someone's home. With its high, arched ceilings, old couches and stacks of records lying around, the studio is the antithesis of most modern recording venues, which tend to have about as much soul as a doctor's office. "I try to make my space feel as comfortable as possible," says the 42-year-old audio engineer and music producer, who, thanks to a keen ear and a handful of recent high-profile recording jobs, has become one of the most prolific and in-demand engineer/producers in the Northwest.
REDMOND'S FIREHOUSE IGNITED TEEN SPIRIT
The Old Firehouse Teen Center in Redmond has been a teen hangout for 15 years. Today, Bellevue, Kirkland and Seattle all have teen programs modeled on Redmond's, and the Redmond staff has helped communities around the country start their own. The Old Firehouse Teen Center celebrated its 15th birthday last weekend.
PORTLAND, SCHMORTLAND - WE STILL SAY SEATTLE ROCKS
Tom Scanlon has written a rebuttal to Slate's recent assertion that Portland is the country's "indie-rock mecca." Scanlon outlines a number of key bands, festivals, and reasons Seattle still reigns supreme in the link above.
A NEW FESTIVAL IS BORN: SLAM IS LATIN CLASSICAL
Latin American music sometimes gets short shrift when it comes to classical programming, with some notable exceptions (including a Seattle Symphony "Viva la Musica" festival four years back). But there will be some strong classical representation - along with an intriguing mix of other musical genres - in the upcoming three-night "SLAM" (Seattle Latin American Music) Festival. Starting on Thursday, the festival will present chamber music by living composers from Argentina, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico and Puerto Rico, played by visiting and local performers in solos and ensembles with acoustic and electronic instrumentation.
Moore TheaterMOORE THEATRE WAS ONCE ANCHOR OF VIBRANT ARTS SCENE
For a city with a rough, pioneer reputation, Seattle was always able to support a vibrant arts scene. A century ago, that scene was centered around Second Avenue downtown. "The Moore Theatre was the northern anchor of Second Avenue, which was the major street in Seattle between 1900 and 1920," Larry Kreisman, program director of the architectural preservation organization Historic Seattle, said. "It was the core of theater, retail and banking." While it once resided alongside the Garden, Embassy and Majestic theaters, The Moore Theatre is the only remaining operational theater from Second Avenue 100 years ago.
COURTNEY LOVE SETTLES THE LAST OF HER NIRVANA MONEY DISPUTES
Court records indicate Courtney Love paid the Hendricks & Lewis firm $1.15 million to represent her in the battle with Nirvana's two surviving members, Dave Grohl and Krist Novoselic. But the attorneys claimed she still owed $341,000, plus as much as $200,000 in interest accrued over five years. In the 2002 case, Love, 43, acting on behalf of herself and her daughter, Frances Bean Cobain, challenged Grohl, Novoselic, and Universal Music Group over the proposed release of the band's final track, "You Know You're Right," and sued for control of Nirvana's musical legacy. The combatants eventually agreed to an out-of-court deal that included the release of a Nirvana box set and a greatest-hits album.
ZOO: DOCUMENTARY RELEASED ON DVD
The tale of a man who took his love for animals a bit too far and paid the ultimate price for it and this film explore his death and desires. The nice sound name for it is zoophilia, but you may know it as bestiality. Yeah, that thing in Enumclaw. The documentary debuted at Sundance in January and was co-created by the Stranger's Charles Mudede.



SEATTLE MOVIE COMPANY SHADOWCATCHER FINDS ITS NICHE
"We make character-driven films with universal themes," says the straight-talking David Skinner, co-founder, owner and manager of ShadowCatcher. "We may go down in smoke on a film we believe in, but we're not just making little art-house movies. Our films have common values, things people are looking for." "Outsourced" certainly fits the bill. Co-written by George Wing ("50 First Dates") and John Jeffcoat, who also directed, the comedy concerns Todd (Josh Hamilton), a Seattle executive who sees his entire department at a novelty company replaced by a cheaper operation in India. Todd is sent to the subcontinent to train replacement workers, and eventually finds his frustration with the global economy softened by friendship, understanding and love. As with ShadowCatcher's 1998 "Smoke Signals," "Outsourced" has done well among audiences on the festival circuit. (The film was voted audience favorite for Best Picture at the 2007 Seattle International Film Festival.)


ENDFEST DRAWS GENERATION
For all, the 10-hour show was an endurance test. For those who packed food, it was banned at the door. But, oily and overpriced arena food awaited them inside. And when the sun went down when Social Distortion took the stage near the end, the dedicated kept bouncing to keep warm, while others withered into little huddles on the pavement - many even lying on each others' legs, staring into the night sky while dozing off to their favorite bands. Endfest 16 capped off the summer beautifully.
TWO CLUBS INVOLVED IN LICENSE DEBATE FOR SALE
Two nightclubs that landed in hot water with Mayor Greg Nickels this summer might be sold, just weeks after a close City Council vote spared the businesses from having to obtain a special city license to operate. Edwin Mirsky, an agent for Ewing & Clark Commercial Brokerage, confirmed Friday that there was a buyer for 2333 Western Ave., where Tabella Restaurant & Lounge has operated since 2005. He refused to give any other details. A deal also is in the works to sell the J&M Caf in Pioneer Square.
NIGHTCLUB LICENSE BOUNCED BY COUNCIL
As Peter Steinbrueck, the harshest critic of the license (he provided a key fifth vote for the amendment before voting against the final legislation), said: "In all of this discussion, I've never been given any details about violence inside clubs. Should we make Macy's or McDonald's get a license?" he asked, referring to the violence that has taken place outside those establishments at Third Avenue and Pine Street. His humorous and spot-on take got raucous applause from the nightclub workers who had packed the hearing. They also cheered loudly when Godden's amendment passed, prompting Clark to turn red.
COMPETITION PULLING ACTS AWAY FROM EVERETT ARENA
Since it opened Sept. 27, 2003, the events center has developed a good reputation in the concert business, said Gary Bongiovanni, editor-in-chief of concert of Pollstar, a trade publication and Web site. But sitting in one of the farthest corners of the country hurts it, Bongiovanni said. "The Northwest doesn't see the same volume of shows because its difficult to route tours up there, and it's kind of the end of the line except for Vancouver or going across Canada," he said. The arena did not make Pollstar's Top 100 Arenas Chart for 2006 or its mid-year 2007 chart, while KeyArena in Seattle and Tacoma Dome both ranked in the 70s.
A TROUBLEMAKER WHO LED A REVOLUTION
FRANOIS TRUFFAUT'S "400 Blows" is now an official classic of French cinema, but when it had its premiere, at the 1959 Cannes Film Festival, it didn't much look like one. And that was the point. Mr. Truffaut, then just 27, had spent his youth as an extremely combative critic for the journal Cahiers du Cinma, in whose pages he regularly savaged the older, established French filmmakers who represented what was called the "tradition of quality." (When he used the term, it didn't sound like a compliment.)
VIOLIN, PIANO IN THE SPOTLIGHT
With the Seattle Symphony still in the news with the record-breaking appointment of four concertmasters, perhaps music lovers with violinists on their mind might enjoy checking out these new CDs by two retired concertmasters with Seattle connections. First of these is Steven Staryk, a former University of Washington faculty member who was dubbed "King of Concertmasters" by The Strad magazine. Staryk had been concertmaster of three major orchestras by the age of 35: the Royal Philharmonic, Royal Concertgebouw and Chicago Symphony. The second is former Seattle Symphony concertmaster Karl-Ove Mannberg, a Swedish violinist who came to Seattle to play under the late Rainer Miedel. The CD, called "Swedish Colours," is an attractive compilation of Swedish musical colors, including hints of folk melody, and the occasional sly interjection of humor. The partnership between pianist and violinist is right on target.
STUDENTS (AND NON) GET SOME HOT INDIE ROCK
With classes starting Wednesday, University of Washington students got a real back-to-school gift Monday night: The biggest indie-rock tour of the fall came right to their backyard, with college-rock giants Arcade Fire and LCD Soundsystem playing Bank of America Arena. But due to ticket prices and a small amount of word of mouth, plenty of UW students left this gift unopened, as the bands played to a mostly post-college crowd. The headliners Arcade Fire opened with "Black Mirror" and "Keep the Car Running," the first two songs from their 2007 album "Neon Bible." They played an energetic set of 10-piece indie rock, combining key songs from both of their full-length releases. Those students who did come got to see an excellent show.
SYMPHONY PLAYS MUSICAL CHAIRS
It's been a month since the Seattle Symphony made international headlines with the announcement that it would become the first American orchestra with four permanent concertmasters. And although the orchestra's first season with the quartet was launched earlier this month, it will be a long time before it's clear how well this groundbreaking arrangement works. Will it be a season of musical chairs, with inconsistent leadership and a series of communications challenges? Or one in which the four violinists energize the strings and the orchestra as a whole with new musical leadership?
EX-CATHETER AND TALL BIRD TURNS TO A ROCK-POSTER ICON FOR CAREER REINVENTION
Brian Standeford designed his first great rock poster last April. It was for a show his recently disassembled band, Tall Birds, were playing at the Crocodile with local up-and-comers, The Pleasureboaters. The poster was a stark, black-and-white, cut-and-paste job. A man's head poked in from the upper left-hand corner of the poster, his mouth agape and showering the rest of the page in a puke-spray of band names. It was funny, clever, and eye-catching-exactly what you'd want when promoting a band. Over the past few months, Standeford has been banging out some great-looking posters. He's still very green and sometimes a little clumsy. But he already possesses a fully formed style: a handmade combination of '60s pop imagery with '70s punk collages.
APART FROM THAT: LIKE CASSAVETES IN SKAGIT COUNTY
Like Cassavetes in the sticks, this Mount Vernon indie was self-financed and shot by Jennifer Shainin and Randy Walker using mostly local, amateur talent. The few trained actors don't stand out much, and that's a compliment. Seen at SIFF '06, Apart From That makes a jumbled democracy of its rustic players; refreshingly, there's not a mumbling hipster among them. The generous ensemble sensibility recalls Miranda July's Me and You and Everyone We Know, with a similar macram plot. Rural aesthetes Shainin and Walker value individual stitch work more than the loosely woven whole. Made close to, but definitely apart from, the Seattle indie scene, their film compares favorably to recent local flicks like Police Beat and Zoo.
OUTSOURCED: SIFF PRIZE WINNER FINALLY REACHES THEATERS
Locally produced and the top prize winner at SIFF this year, Outsourced has all the charm and color of its made-in-India locations, yet it's crafted-well crafted-according to familiar Hollywood convention. Director John Jeffcoat and co-writer George Wing took the DIY route with their eminently salable script, in which an unhappy Seattle yuppie (Josh Hamilton, The House of Yes) is sent to train his replacement in India, where he meets a cute girl (Ayesha Dharker, The Terrorist) who causes him to reconsider his workaholic life. Yes, there are wandering cows, weird food, and the inevitable diarrhea jokes, but Outsourced has a gentle touch with the obvious fish-out-of-water touchstones.
AMAZON LAUNCHES MUSIC DOWNLOAD SERVICE
The Seattle online retailer said it's launched its digital music download service, Amazon MP3, which will provide music to all types of music players. the site has more than 2 million songs from more than 180,000 artists. Unlike similar sites such as Apple's iTunes, Amazon's MP3 site doesn't use digital rights management (DRM) software, which means Amazon customers can freely move the music from their iPod or computer to any other device that plays music. Amazon said most songs will cost between 89 cents and 99 cents.
HEADLIGHTS LOOK LIKE DIAMONDS, HEC ED DOES NOT LOOK LIKE A MUSIC VENUE
Last night's Arcade Fire show was rife with problems. Not with the Arcade Fire, Lord knows they can do no wrong, but with the opening bands, and most of all, with the venue. Somehow, even though the scheduled time for the show was 7:30pm, the time published everywhere---on the Ticketmaster site, in ads for the show, in UW emails, on the goddamn tickets---doors actually opened at 6:30pm and the Gossip started playing right around 7. This would explain why no one was there for their set. And then there was the issue of wristbands. Apparently, despite everyone having general admission tickets, to get on the floor, you needed to have a wristband, and to have a wristband, you needed to have gotten there early. Once again, something that no one thought fit to inform the masses before they arrived at the show.