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Film + Music Newsletter 7/25/2007


INDUSTRY NEWS AND UPDATES
VULCAN AND RICK STEVENSON TEAM UP FOR FILM SERIES, LOOKING TO BE SHOT LOCALLY
Vulcan Productions has acquired the rights to five novels written by Seattle author, Deb Caletti. Her books, coming-of-age stories of five different girls, ages 16 to 18, will be made into a series of movies entitled "Nine Mile Falls." The movies will all be shot locally and will be co-written and directed by Seattle filmmaker, Rick Stevenson. Vulcan hopes to start filming the first movie, "Honey, Baby, Sweetheart," by next spring. Congratulations to Deb, Rick and Vulcan!
THREE DOLLAR BILL CINEMA PRESENTS CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON
As a part of the outdoor cinema series at Cal Anderson, the creepy classic "Creature from the Black Lagoon" will be shown the way it was meant to be seen, in 3-D! Glasses will be provided. The free movie screening will take place at Cal Anderson Park on August 11 at 8:30 PM.
FILM BABY OPENS UP SELF-DISTRIBUTION FRONTIER FOR FILMMAKERS
Film Baby - a spin-off of the legendary CD Baby - has opened up the self-distribution frontier for independent filmmakers through a series of groundbreaking partnerships. Besides providing a popular online channel to indie fans for DVD sales, Film Baby now gives member filmmakers direct access to Super D, Netflix, CinemaNow, and Amazon CustomFlix - representing a range of distribution opportunities that typically require representation by a professional sales agent.
LOCAL SCREENWRITER, GEORGE WING'S "HALO" PICKED UP BY USA NETWORK
USA Network has announced their new lineup of original programming that is being developed for 2008, including the project, "Halo." George Wing, the Seattle screenwriter whose credits include "50 First Dates" and "Outsourced" is in negotiations with USA as writer and executive producer for "Halo." Congratulations to George!
JOHN VANDERSLICE TOURS THE BLOGOSPHERE
John Vanderslice and his band have performed and taped each song from his forthcoming Barsuk Records release Emerald City from his San Francisco based Tiny Telephone studio. These fine videos are to be enjoyed by the world via the magic of the interwebs. Video for each track will be posted semi-daily over the coming weeks on some of JV's favorite blogs. Videos are currently available at the Stereogum and Gorilla vs. Bear blogs.


GERMAN WEBSITE PROMOTING SEATTLE TOURISM AND FILM INDUSTRY
German website, Prost Amerika, promotes the Pacific Northwest to potential German tourists, covering events and attractions such as Seattle Sounders soccer games, the Pacific Northwest Ballet and SIFF. The website reviewed 58 films in both German and English during this year's festival and was the most comprehensive source of non-English coverage for the film festival. For more information, visit the Prost Amerika website.
MEDIA DIGEST
PAUL ALLEN'S NEXT FILM PROJECTS ARE LOCAL
Vulcan announced Wednesday it had acquired the rights to five young-adult novels by Seattle area author Deb Caletti, which it intends to develop as a series of feature films for television, with theatrical distribution abroad. The project is being overseen by Seattle filmmaker Rick Stevenson, who will co-write (with Caletti) the script and direct the first installment in the series, "Honey, Baby, Sweetheart," which Vulcan hopes to have before the cameras next spring.
TURTLE RESCUE MISSION INSPIRES LOCAL FILMMAKER
Richard Ogust is a writer-turned-turtle conservationist whose story is told in a fine documentary, "The Chances of the World Changing," airing as part of PBS' "P.O.V" series at 10 tonight. It's a moving, lingering film about one man's mindfulness of the natural world, which is partly what attracted Seattle-based filmmaker Nell Carden Grey, 30, to the project.
SOUNDS OF SILENCE: INTERNET RADIO HANGS ON
Negotiations between SoundExchange, the organization that collects and distributes music royalties, and assorted groups representing Internet radio stations have postponed the ruin of the innovative medium. The last-minute negotiations happened after the public uproar about the Copyright Royalty Board's new payment system for Internet radio stations, which kind of took effect Sunday.
HORSE AND BUGGERY
It has become something of a tradition at the Sundance Film Festival for a project to stand out for its shock effect. There have been movies that touch on madness, serial killers and prostitution. But in January, two Seattle-based filmmakers trumped all that with their most recent film, Zoo.
ALL-AGES VENUES POPPING UP ALL OVER
While the crowd inside was rocking out to energetic bands, three young men loitered on the grungy sidewalk, listening to the dull rumble of nearby I-5. These three - members of Fall of Troy - weren't allowed into the bar until it was time for their band to take the stage, because they weren't yet 21 years old. . . The number of youth-friendly shows in Seattle has steadily increased since the demise of Seattle's restrictive Teen Dance Ordinance in 2002.
SIFF SERIES FEATURES FILMS IN THE SPIRIT OF MOZART'S WORK
When SIFF Cinema at McCaw Hall opened earlier this year, skeptical cinephiles wondered how the new venue would fare as a year-round offshoot of the Seattle International Film Festival. Would the programming be savvy? Would the venue live up to its hype?
SEATTLEITES ARE INVITED TO ADD THEIR VOICES TO THE CHORUS
For the 28th year, any Seattle singer of whatever caliber can join in the Summer Sings, hosted by the Seattle Symphony Chorale.
WALKING TO WERNER
"Walking to Werner," in which the filmmaker Linas Phillips records his journey on foot from Seattle to Los Angeles to meet his hero, the director Werner Herzog ("Aguirre: The Wrath of God," "Rescue Dawn"), pays tribute to the master in two obvious ways. It's an illustration of Mr. Herzog's preference for art-as-endurance test, exemplified by his own 1974 walk from Munich to Paris to visit his ailing mentor, the film historian Lotte Eisner. And it's a deeply self-reflexive work, perpetually at risk of disappearing into its own iris.
SUMMER CINEMA'S ONE-WEEK WONDERS
After its superstrong $182 million opening week in May, "Spider-Man 3" plunged at the box office by 61 percent the next week. "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End" sank like a stone in its second week, dropping 66 percent. And when the box office gross for "Transformers" fell by only 47 percent after a week in theaters, Hollywood marveled at the movie's strength.
THE NEW RADIO? MORE FANS FINDING MUSIC ON TV: EXPOSURE ON THE TUBE HELPS INDIE MUSICIANS REACH A WIDER AUDIENCE
Kevin Edelman gets a real kick out of introducing the public to new music. He played Vonda Shepard before she got her gig on "Ally McBeal." He played Maroon 5 before they hit the big time. And he recently gave thousands of music fans their first exposure to British rockers Kasabian.
NORTHWEST SYMPHONY GETS ASCAP AWARD
The Northwest Symphony Orchestra and founding music director Anthony Spain recently won a 2006-07 ASCAP Award for Programming of Contemporary Music, presented annually by the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers and the American Symphony Orchestra League.





MAYOR FAILS IN ATTEMPT TO SUSPEND NIGHTCLUB'S LICENSE
Tabella Restaurant & Lounge was spared Friday from an emergency suspension of its liquor license, but the Belltown dance club isn't in the clear.
WAYWARD MUSIC FESTIVAL LET MUSICIANS EXPLORE WITH A FEW EXCEPTIONS, PERFORMERS DIDN'T VEER VERY FAR OFF TRACK
The Festival of Wayward Music, celebrating the new home for creative music at Wallingford's Good Shepherd Building, offered a variety of musical experience, with more than 50 musicians performing 15-minute sets over the festival's 10-hour duration.
CLEAR CHANNEL REVISES INDIE CONTRACT
Clear Channel has revised its online agreement for indie artists and labels who want to upload their music to be considered for broadcast and digital downloading. The agreement, which came under the spotlight when the American Assn. of Independent Music (AAIM) emailed its members urging them not to sign the license, was interpreted as waiving artists' and labels' right to receive royalties.
RADIO LISTENERS SEEM TO BUY LESS MUSIC
During the past month, musicians and record labels have resumed their decades-old fight to make AM and FM stations pay royalties to performers. A new group, the MusicFirst Coalition, has publicized a six-month-old study that suggests that radio play hurts record sales.
SOUNDEXCHANGE BACKTRACKS ON NET RADIO FEES
Last week saw a step backwards in the ongoing battle between SoundExchange and webcasters to find a resolution to the Copyright Royalty Board's ruling to increase royalty rates. Originally, SoundExchange announced it will cap minimum fees at $2,500. Now, SoundExchange informed the Digital Media Association (DiMa) that it will not reduce the minimum royalty unless Internet radio services agree to a number of technology mandates that the DiMA finds "unreasonable, unworkable and way off-topic."
SYMPHONY IN THE BLACK FOR THE YEAR
The Seattle Symphony has dodged a huge fiscal iceberg, it announced Monday, citing extraordinary fundraising efforts that fended off a projected $2.5 million deficit on a $22.5 million budget for the 2006-07 season. Instead of a big shortfall, the orchestra is expected to balance its books for the first time in several years - an outcome that new Symphony executive director Tom Philion calls "tremendously exciting news for us."
DULLI/LANEGAN PROJECT SIGN TO SUB POP
Alt-rock icons Greg Dulli (Afghan Whigs, Twilight Singers) and Mark Lanegan (Screaming Trees, Queens of the Stone Age), together known as the Gutter Twins, have signed to Sub Pop.
SHREVEPORT LURES PRODUCTION
"We woke up one morning and found ourselves in the film business," said Arlena Acree, director of Film, Media and Entertainment for the mayor's office in Shreveport, La. Every city should be so lucky -- although Shreveport isn't gloating. It was after Katrina devastated New Orleans along with its thriving film production that filmmakers redirected their production lenses to the film friendly environs of Shreveport.
FILM BUSINESS BOOSTS U.K. ECONOMY
2006 was a bumper year for the U.K. film biz, contributing 4.3 billion ($8.8 billion) to the country's economy - a 39% increase on 2004, according to a report by research org Oxford Economics. According to the report, the U.K. film industry has enjoyed a near 300% rise in production levels from an average of 43 features made a year in the 1980s to an average of 120 since 2000. Some 33,500 people are directly employed in the U.K. film biz, with a total of 95,000 jobs supported by the industry.
HOLLYWOOD HOPEFULS (DREAM ON) AT PITCHFEST
So, here's the pitch: 200 writers from all over pay $395 apiece to take face-to-face meetings with legitimate Hollywood buyers and brokers. Scouts from top talent agencies and management firms, studios and production companies are seated behind little conference tables, waiting to be bowled over.
FANS VOTE AIDEN IN MTV2 CONTEST
Seattle's Aiden has won MTV2's "Book the Band" competition - thanks largely to one East Coast fan who voted for the hardcore/punk band 48,000 times. With 419,387 votes, Aiden edged out Say Anything (405,570 votes) and three other finalists to win an appearance at the prestigious Virgin Festival (Aug. 4-5 in Baltimore, headlined by the Police and Smashing Pumpkins).
JONI MITCHELL JOINS MCCARTNEY ON HEAR MUSIC ROSTER
Joni Mitchell, who had been largely retired from the music business since 2002, has joined Paul McCartney on the roster of Starbucks Entertainment's Hear Music label. Mitchell's new album, "Shine," will be released Sept. 25 through the coffee retailer's stores as well as traditional outlets.
AMAZON TRIPLES ITS PROFIT, TOPS EXPECTATIONS
Amazon.com's second-quarter profit more than tripled, boosted by strong sales of books, music and electronics worldwide. The strong results pushed the Web retailer's stock up 11.3 percent in after-hours trading. Earnings for the three months ended June 30 climbed to $78 million, or 19 cents a share, from $22 million, or 5 cents a share during the same period last year, the company said this afternoon.
Pike Place Market is a village in a city. From the honey hucksters to the busking banjoists, the people of the market run on love, hard work, and a good dose of kookiness. Playwright Donna Rae Davidson drew on 15 years of working in the market for her new musical The North Arcade. Today, Donna Rae tells us how her extended Market family inspired her to share their stories, and we'll hear a musical number celebrating the market's handmade crafts.