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2000 Seattle Election Information

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General Election Voters' Guide
Prop 1 - Parks, Green Spaces, Trails & Zoo Levy

General
Election
Voters'
Guide
Introduction
 
Prop 1
Parks Levy

Statement
For and
Rebuttal


Statement
Against and
Rebuttal

Title &
Explanation


Complete Text

 
Prop 2
Init 53
Monorail

Statement
For and
Rebuttal


Statement
Against and
Rebuttal


Title &
Explanation


Complete Text

 
 
  Statement Against
 
 

On November 7, 2000 — vote NO — Proposition 1,
Seattle’s $198,200,000 Park levy.

This park levy’s “wish list” is too long and too expensive. Ordinance 120024 concedes that “ … the current general fund …. does not provide sufficient resources to implement all of the recommendations called for in the plans… .” Nevertheless, Seattle’s elected officials are determined to implement this bloated “second- to-none” park levy - regardless of cost - taxing property owners $25 million a year for eight years in addition to the Park Department’s fixed $55.5 million annual budget. That’s a total of $644 million for parks over the next eight years.

This pervasive ploy of submitting levies and bond measures to the electorate has served our elected officials exceedingly well. Their argument, which implies voters are taxing only themselves, is misleading. In reality, all of Seattle’s property owners will be subject to the additional taxation on the “Yes” votes of as few as one-third of Seattle’s registered voters. Only voting NO can stop this ploy.

Proposition 1 also helps expose another self-serving bureaucratic scheme. “Voter approved” levies and bond measures which fund major projects, essentially relieve Seattle’s officials of their responsibility for resulting property tax increases. Consequently, they hold themselves blameless for any rental increases “passed-on” to homes, apartments, retail and commercial properties.

It cannot be repeated often enough: Only Seattle’s property owners will bear the entire public cost of Proposition 1. It is an unfair and unjustified tax.

Seattle Proposition 1 — Vote NO

Many critical elements could have been financed with councilmanic bonds, which are intended for unforeseen critical needs. More importantly they don’t require voter approval to be used. Unfortunately, the City’s $650 million “credit card” was “maxed-out” by our elected officials on their own “pet” projects. There was very little left on the “card” for any part of this complex park levy.

A current City “pet” project is the $226 million City Hall and Civic Center complex, funded by these same councilmanic bonds. Seattle’s elected officials have obviously concluded “pet” projects come first when deciding their funding priorities.

The only vote Proposition 1 deserves is — NO.

The City’s philosophy for initiating projects is fatally flawed. In this case, if this “park” is funded by this levy for only eight years, how will programs produced by it be sustained afterward? Another levy in 2008? Forever more?

 
  Statement prepared by:
 
  Bob Hegamin
Fred Bucke
Phone: (206) 932-6949
Fax: (206) 932-6949 (call first)
Email: politicalintegrity@hotmail.com
Website: http://listen.to/politicalintegrity
 
  Rebuttal to Statement Against
 
 

VOTE YES ON PROP. 1 – FROM GRASSROOTS TO PARKS

Through the time-honored democratic process, Seattle voters have a choice regarding our parks. In an era when development is intensifying, voters have a chance to invest in new and improved parks throughout the city - while the land is still available.

After an extensive public involvement process - with participation by a broad cross-section of Seattle citizens who identified parks and recreation opportunities - voters have a unique chance to preserve, enhance and improve our parks.

With a YES vote we can leave a lasting legacy for our children and grandchildren and secure the park and recreational priorities that so many helped identify across Seattle.

 
  Rebuttal prepared by:
 
  Kay Bullitt, Neighbors for Seattle Parks, Treasurer
Margaret Ceis, Commuity Parks Advocate, Chair
James Fearn, Neighborhood Pro-Parks 2000, Former Chair
Dave Towne, Woodland Park Zoological Society, President
Neighbors for Seattle Parks
313 Minor Avenue N.
Seattle, WA 98109
Phone: (206) 342-9988
Fax: (206) 382-1224
Email: info@parksforall.com
Website: www.parksforall.com
 
 
 
 
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