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FAQs

Create a Thriving Business District

ALLEY & SECURITY LIGHTING

If you have a dark alley or other areas near your business that could benefit from additional lighting, City Light has a process to help you. City Light can install and maintain high-pressure sodium streetlights or floodlights that will enhance your outdoor security lighting.

City Light maintains lighting standards throughout the city but it is not legally responsible for lighting alleys. Yet, since the security of its customers is important, City Lights wants to support businesses in making lighting improvements.

Streetlights provide general illumination and floodlights light a specific area. There is a monthly charge for the electricity and maintenance of the lights and there may also be an installation fee, depending on your situation. Often, there is no installation charge if the light is installed on an existing pole; however, if there are no existing poles or if the installers have to put in cabling to reach a power source, there will be a charge.

To get an estimate for installation costs or for more information, call City Light Customer Engineering: North of Denny Way call 206-615-0600; South of Denny Way call 206-386-4200. Written permission from the building owner is required if lights are to be attached to a building. City Light will not set poles in alleys for lighting.

Monthly Charges for City-Installed Floodlights and Streetlights:

The monthly charges for floodlights and streetlights shown below include fixture maintenance, lamp replacement, energy costs and scheduled pole maintenance. (Prices shown are as of December 2006).

HPS = high pressure sodium

Streetlights

Charge

 

Floodlights

Charge

100-watt HPS

$5.44 per month

 

100-watt HPS

$5.49 per month

200-watt HPS

$6.60 per month

 

150-watt HPS

$6.10 per month

250-watt HPS

$7.38 per month

 

200-watt HPS

$6.32 per month

400-watt HPS

$8.97 per month

 

250-watt HPS

$6.99 per month

 

 

 

400-watt HPS

$7.82 per month

100-watt HPS “HISTORIC ” streetlight fixtures are also available for $8.51 per month.

Estimated Energy Costs for Self-Installed Floodlights:

If you purchase and install a floodlight on your property, estimated monthly energy costs (as of December 2006) are approximately:

Floodlights

Energy Charge

200-watt HPS

$2.30 per month

250-watt HPS

$2.97 per month

400-watt HPS

$4.36 per month

Frequently asked questions:

Why do we have to pay for extra lighting?

City Light and Seattle Department of Transportation maintain lighting standards throughout the entire city. If you would like higher than standard lighting, you can either obtain it yourself or follow the standard process.

How much light do I need?

The Seattle Energy Code Standards recommend the following lighting guidelines:

  • Outdoor lighting for sidewalks and surface parking lots should have .05 watts per square foot. For example, if you have a 5,000 square foot parking lot, you would need a 250-watt bulb. Installation height will vary based on the area covered and the intensity of light needed.
  • To light the side of a building plan for 7.5 watts per linear foot of perimeter.
Benefits and challenges of alley and security lighting:
BENEFITS
  • Enhances safety and security for customers, employees, businesses and property owners.
  • Possibly reduces crime, loitering, illegal dumping, etc.

CHALLENGES

  • Electricity usage must be paid for, and installation and maintenance costs may be incurred.

Contacts

 

CITY OF SEATTLE

http://www.seattle.gov

  • Seattle City Light

 

          General information --------------------------------------------------

206-684-3000

          North of Denny Way--------------------------------------------------

206-615-0600

          South of Denny Way--------------------------------------------------

206-386-4200

          General SCL website: http://www.seattle.gov/light

NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS CONTACTS