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Start, Grow, or Green Your Business Stephen H. Johnson, Director
Business Owners Business Districts Key Industries News and Resources
Overview
Introduction
Letter from the Mayor
How to Use This Guide
Abbreviations Used in This Guide
Hints for Successful Business District Improvements
Beautification Projects
Flower Planters
Holiday Lighting
Metro Bus Shelters
Public Art
Street Trees
Clean and Green Seattle Initiative
Enhancement Projects
Street Furniture
Pedestrian Lighting
Bicycle Racks
Newspaper Boxes
Funding
Office of Economic Development
Neighborhood Matching Fund
Forming a Business Improvement Area
Grant Programs
Services to Businesses
Maintenance
Litter Cans
Sidewalk Cleaning
Spring Clean
Street Cleaning
Street Paving
Graffiti
Building/Fire Code Violations
Parking
Managing Parking
Public Safety
Street Light & Power Line Repair
Alley & Security Lighting
Crime Prevention
Emergency Preparedness
Signs
Banners
District Identification Signs
A-Frame
Traffic Controls
STOP SIGNS AND SPEED REDUCTION
TRAFFIC SIGNALS
MARKED CROSSWALKS
Use of Public Areas
City Parks
Sidewalk Cafes
Street Vendors
Additional Information
Neighborhood Business District Support
Business Dists., Merchants Assns., Chambers of Commerce
Community Development Corporations
FAQs

Create a Thriving Business District

STREET FURNITURE

Many neighborhoods have successfully incorporated street furniture into their business districts. Street furniture can include: benches, water fountains, kiosks, clocks, etc. Before you decide on a location, remember to keep street furniture away from crosswalks, curb cuts, fire hydrants and loading and bus zones. There should also be a minimum 5 feet of clear passage on sidewalks to ensure pedestrian safety.

If street furniture is located on a public right-of-way such as a sidewalk, you will need to get a street use permit from the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT). SDOT will want to see a design plan with specifications such as the materials, exact site and the amount of drilling necessary. Street use permits may be renewed annually. All street furniture not owned by the City requires an indemnity agreement.

Frequently asked questions:
Who has the responsibility for maintaining the furniture ?

The sponsoring group must maintain and clean all furniture that it installs. Choose materials carefully as some require less maintenance.

Does the City mandate specific designs?

No, decisions on design and materials are made by sponsoring groups, within reason.

Do we need a permit for street furniture?

Yes, street furniture requires an annual permit and insurance or indemnity agreement.

Where can we purchase such furniture?

Contact a neighborhood architect or landscaper for a list of suppliers.

Benefits and challenges of street furniture:

BENEFITS

  • Adds attractive and recognizable features to your district.
  • Are useful as well as attractive: benches provide a place to sit, clocks and kiosks are sources of information, etc.

CHALLENGES

  • Requires liability insurance if placed on public right-of-way.
  • Requires maintenance and routine cleaning.

Contacts

 

CITY OF SEATTLE

http://www.seattle.gov

NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS CONTACTS

 

  • Greater University Chamber of Commerce
    Teresa Lord Hugel------------------------------------------- 206-547-4417
    Email: director@udistrictchamber.org