Working for a safe, affordable, vibrant, innovative, and interconnected city.
Learn More
Seattle.gov Home Page
Seattle.gov This Department
Link to OED Home Page Link to OED Home Page Link to OED About Us Page Link to OED Contact Us Page
Start, Grow, or Green Your Business Stephen H. Johnson, Director
Business Owners Business Districts Key Industries News and Resources
Overview
Introduction
Letter from the Mayor
How to Use This Guide
Abbreviations Used in This Guide
Hints for Successful Business District Improvements
Beautification Projects
Flower Planters
Holiday Lighting
Metro Bus Shelters
Public Art
Street Trees
Clean and Green Seattle Initiative
Enhancement Projects
Street Furniture
Pedestrian Lighting
Bicycle Racks
Newspaper Boxes
Funding
Office of Economic Development
Neighborhood Matching Fund
Forming a Business Improvement Area
Grant Programs
Services to Businesses
Maintenance
Litter Cans
Sidewalk Cleaning
Spring Clean
Street Cleaning
Street Paving
Graffiti
Building/Fire Code Violations
Parking
Managing Parking
Public Safety
Street Light & Power Line Repair
Alley & Security Lighting
Crime Prevention
Emergency Preparedness
Signs
Banners
District Identification Signs
A-Frame
Traffic Controls
STOP SIGNS AND SPEED REDUCTION
TRAFFIC SIGNALS
MARKED CROSSWALKS
Use of Public Areas
City Parks
Sidewalk Cafes
Street Vendors
Additional Information
Neighborhood Business District Support
Business Dists., Merchants Assns., Chambers of Commerce
Community Development Corporations
FAQs

Create a Thriving Business District

SPRING CLEAN AND COMMUNITY CLEANUP

Spring Clean is a great way to beautify your business district. Spring Clean, Seattle ’s cleanup of public spaces, is held by Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) throughout April and early May. This program provides groups with plastic bags, free disposal and assistance. SPU will also be glad to help with neighborhood stewardship projects any time of the year – not just in the spring.

How to get involved:

  • Organize a team : Team up with other businesses, neighbors, a nearby school, community groups, family and friends.
  • Choose your project: Project ideas include: picking up litter, planting flowers, painting out graffiti, creating a mural or any other project which will beautify the public spaces in your neighborhood. The Rainier Chamber of Commerce, Queen Anne Chamber of Commerce, Lake City Chamber of Commerce and the University District all run model Spring Clean programs.
  • Register: Send for a registration packet, which contains information on how to get free plastic bags and passes to a Recycling and Disposal Station. In addition, the City can work to get other individuals in your area matched to your team.

For more information, call 206-233-7187 or request an information packet by sending your name, group name, address, day and evening phone to:

Community Cleanup /Spring Clean
Seattle Public Utilities
700 5 th Ave Ste 4900
P.O. Box 34018
Seattle, WA 98124-4018

You can also visit: http://www.seattle.gov/util/Services/Garbage/Reduce_Garbage_&_Litter/
Spring_Clean/index.asp
and access a volunteer form online at: http://www.seattle.gov/util/stellent/groups/public/@spu/documents/webcontent/
spu01_001982.pdf
.

Frequently asked questions:

How can Spring Clean help my area?

Spring Clean is a great way to mobilize your business district for year-long beautification benefits.

Is Spring Clean the same as the Home Cleanup Program?

No. Spring Clean is a volunteer-driven cleanup of public spaces (such as streets, roads, alleys and open spaces). The Home Cleanup Program operates a little differently; information regarding this event is mailed out by zip codes as to where home items can be dropped off.

Contacts

 

CITY OF SEATTLE

http://www.seattle.gov