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Start, Grow, or Green Your Business Stephen H. Johnson, Director
Business Owners Business Districts Key Industries News and Resources
Overview
Introduction
Letter from the Mayor
How to Use This Guide
Abbreviations Used in This Guide
Hints for Successful Business District Improvements
Beautification Projects
Flower Planters
Holiday Lighting
Metro Bus Shelters
Public Art
Street Trees
Clean and Green Seattle Initiative
Enhancement Projects
Street Furniture
Pedestrian Lighting
Bicycle Racks
Newspaper Boxes
Funding
Office of Economic Development
Neighborhood Matching Fund
Forming a Business Improvement Area
Grant Programs
Services to Businesses
Maintenance
Litter Cans
Sidewalk Cleaning
Spring Clean
Street Cleaning
Street Paving
Graffiti
Building/Fire Code Violations
Parking
Managing Parking
Public Safety
Street Light & Power Line Repair
Alley & Security Lighting
Crime Prevention
Emergency Preparedness
Signs
Banners
District Identification Signs
A-Frame
Traffic Controls
STOP SIGNS AND SPEED REDUCTION
TRAFFIC SIGNALS
MARKED CROSSWALKS
Use of Public Areas
City Parks
Sidewalk Cafes
Street Vendors
Additional Information
Neighborhood Business District Support
Business Dists., Merchants Assns., Chambers of Commerce
Community Development Corporations
FAQs

Create a Thriving Business District

THE OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Overview

This section covers funding opportunities with the Office of Economic Development; funding opportunities with the Department of Neighborhoods; steps for forming a Business Improvement Area (BIA); other grant programs citywide (see Grant Programs matrix on pages 29-30); and free services to businesses (see Services to Businesses matrix on pages 31-34).

OED’s Neighborhood Business District Program

The Office of Economic Development (OED)’s Neighborhood Business District Program is designed to help neighborhood business districts and business organizations to develop and attain their goals of growing and strengthening their local business communities. Each year, usually in March, OED issues a Request for Proposals (RFP). Non-profit organizations interested in completing projects and/or providing services that benefit a Seattle neighborhood business district may submit eligible proposals to OED. Awards are typically within a range of $5,000 through $20,000.

Organizations must have a federal tax ID number, and must provide services in a Seattle neighborhood business district (such as chambers of commerce, merchant’s organizations, and business improvement associations). Applicants should have an explicitly stated mission or goal of strengthening the business community in the neighborhood.

What types of projects are eligible?

OED seeks projects that focus on, but are not solely limited to organizational development of neighborhood business district groups, marketing, and physical improvements in neighborhood business districts. Specifically, in 2006, OED encouraged the following types of projects:

  • Projects that support immigrant and refugee business development;
  • Projects that improve pedestrian safety in neighborhood business districts;
  • Projects that help to remove graffiti in neighborhood business districts.

Contacts

 

CITY OF SEATTLE

http://www.seattle.gov