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In this Issue — August 2012

 Message from the director: New funding program launched to serve arts jobs
 Arts Means Business funding for arts jobs opens early August
 Join us for Mayor's Arts Awards, preview Bumbershoot Visual Arts
 Call for visual artists for Arts & Social Change Symposium
 Seattlight lights up King Street Station's Jackson Plaza
 Leo Berk to create artwork for Highland Park
 Celeste Cooning to create artwork for Jackson Park trail
 Brazilian, Motown, indie and alt-country music on City Hall plaza this month
 Public art program involves summer intern in conservation work



Funding:
Arts Mean Business
Application available early August
Calls for Artists
Jobs
Funding
Training

Sambatuque, free concert

Arts Mean Business Information Session

Bobby Medina & The Red Hot Band, free concert

Seattle Arts Commission Meeting

Kris Orlowski, free concert

Arts Mean Business Information Session

Jon Solo, free concert

Kasey Anderson with special guest Star Anna, free concert

2012 Mayor's Arts Awards


City Hall Lobby and Anne Focke galleries:
Our Children, Our Voices
Through Sept. 5
Seattle Municipal Tower:
BIG AND BOLD: An Exhibition of Sizable Artworks
Through Sept. 28
 
Image: Audience members watching the 2011 Mayor's Arts Awards ceremony. Join us at the annual Mayor's Arts Awards, noon, Friday, Aug. 31, at Seattle Center's North Fountain Lawn. Photo by Jennifer Richard.
Message from the director: New funding program launched to serve arts jobs
 
 
An aerial artist from Vau de Vire Society glides above the Bumbershoot crowd at Seattle Center. Photo by Christopher Nelson.
 
We have exciting news this month—we are launching a brand new funding program that will directly support arts jobs. We know from the Arts & Economic Prosperity IV study that the local nonprofit arts and cultural community supports more than 10,000 jobs. But we also know that many arts organizations struggle when it comes to paying staff to administer the presentation of their work. It's especially difficult to be innovative or experimental in ways that might enable the organization to earn extra income when staff resources are so tight.

In recognition of this gap, we created Arts Mean Business grants, a program by which organizations can apply for funds that will allow them to hire new staff or extend the hours of current staff in order to implement plans that will generate extra revenue. The idea is that by funding new and innovative ideas in the short term, organizations will come up with long-term revenue generation solutions. It's good stuff. I hope you'll consider applying, or pass the information on to an organization that you think could benefit. As with all new grants, we know there will be lots of questions about the process. We invite you to attend one of our workshops for more information, or please don't hesitate to pick up the phone and call us and we'll talk you through it.

Last month we dedicated a new work of art at Jefferson Park by Elizabeth Conner, which is quite impactful. You may be interested in an interview with Conner on her thoughts on how the works turned out, challenges, and working with the landscape architects over the last few years to make it happen.

I also want to invite you to attend the Mayor's Arts Awards ceremony this month, at noon on Friday, Aug. 31 at Seattle Center. We're celebrating the 10th anniversary of the awards this year, and in honor of that celebration Mayor Mike McGinn has announced 10 fantastic recipients. The ceremony is free and provides a great opportunity to recognize the incredible artistic community in which we live. At the same time, you can check out the Bumbershoot Visual Arts Exhibits opening before the festival starts. I hope you'll join us.

Sincerely,

Vincent E. Kitch
Director
 
Arts Means Business funding for arts jobs opens early August
 
 
Photographs being hung for the Museum of History & Industry's exhibition Picturing What Matters. Photo courtesy of MOHAI.
 
Applications for the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs' new Arts Mean Business funding program will be available in early August with a deadline of Monday, Sept. 10. This program will award one-time funding to Seattle arts, heritage, cultural and arts-service organizations for arts jobs that will make a difference in each organization's ability to generate extra revenue to carry out its mission.

Funds may be used to support salaried or contract positions that are crucial to the implementation of sustainable revenue strategies. These may be new positions or additional hours for existing positions.

Eligible organizations must be Seattle-based with at least a three-year operating history as a legally established, not-for-profit organization; have as its primary purpose an arts, culture or heritage focus; and demonstrate a record of ongoing artistic or cultural accomplishments serving Seattle residents.

We strongly encourage all applicants to attend an information session, 5:30 to 7p.m., Monday, Aug. 13, at Seattle Public Library's Douglass-Truth Branch; and 1 to 2:30 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 21 at Seattle City Hall. Space is limited. RSVP is required by contacting Kathy Hsieh, (206) 733-9926.
 
Join us for Mayor's Arts Awards, preview Bumbershoot Visual Arts
 
 
Mayor Mike McGinn at the 2011 Mayor's Arts Awards ceremony. Photo by Jennifer Richard.
 
Join Mayor Mike McGinn in celebrating 10 years of Seattle's creative community and this year's award recipients at the annual Mayor's Arts Awards, noon, Friday, Aug. 31, at Seattle Center's North Fountain Lawn. The Bumbershoot Visual Arts Exhibits will also be open for a free public preview from 1 to 9 p.m. No reservation necessary.

In honor of the awards' 10th anniversary, 10 groups and individuals are being honored this year. The winners are: Freehold Theatre Lab/Studio; KEXP; Li Hengda, choreographer, artistic director and founder of the American Asian Performing Arts Theatre and Hengda Dance Academy; Lucia Neare's Theatrical Wonders; Seattle Arts & Lectures; Buster Simpson, public artist; Three Dollar Bill Cinema; TilibSedeb (Singing Feet), the Duwamish Tribe's language and culture performance group; The Vera Project; and Olivier Wevers, dancer, choreographer and artistic director of contemporary dance company Whim W'Him.

The Mayor's Arts Awards ceremony is presented in partnership with BumbershootŪ: Seattle's Music & Arts Festival with support from event sponsor Chihuly Garden and Glass and media sponsor City Arts magazine.
 
Call for visual artists for Arts & Social Change Symposium
 
 
An artist performs at the 2010 Ethnic Arts Connection, an event that connected arts presenters with ethnic performing artists. Hosted by the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs, Seattle Center, 4Culture, Washington State Arts Commission, Ethnic Heritage Council, Festál, Northwest Folklife and Arts Northwest. Photo by Robert Wade.
 
We're seeking visual artists who are using their art to create social justice and to advance progressive change to exhibit their work at the Arts & Social Change Symposium, Oct. 12 to 13 at Seattle Center. The call is open to 2-D visual artists and students residing in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia. The Arts & Social Change Symposium Steering Committee encourages diversity in what will be displayed.

Completed electronic submissions are due to ASCSymposium@gmail.com by 5 p.m., Friday, Aug. 24. Go here for submission guidelines and more information.

Arts & Social Change will address the role that diverse arts play in creating awareness, inspiring cultural understanding, and developing policies to address equity and social change. Go here for more information on the symposium. Join the Arts & Social Change email list to receive updates and information about registration in August.

Arts & Social Change is hosted by the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs in partnership with Washington State Arts Commission, The Wallace Foundation, 4Culture, Seattle Center and FESTAL, Seattle Office for Civil Rights , and The Association of American Cultures.
 
Seattlight lights up King Street Station's Jackson Plaza
 
 
Rebar, Seattlight concept illustration.
 
The San Francisco artist group Rebar has installed their new temporary installation Seattlight at King Street Station's newly refurbished Jackson Plaza. Seattlight is a nighttime, interactive artwork designed to highlight the unseen pathways of pedestrian traffic through the plaza. The artwork lights up in response to the movements of people as they walk past and through the space.

The artwork was commissioned to celebrate the new public plaza created as part of the King Street Station restoration. Seattlight will remain on view throughout 2012.

Rebar's work encompasses public art, landscape design, urban intervention and temporary performance installation. The team has exhibited and lectured worldwide, including at such venues as the Venice Architecture Biennale, ExperimentaDesign Amsterdam, ISEA 2009 Dublin, the American Institute of Architects, the Canadian Center for Architecture and the Harvard Graduate School of Design.

Seattlight was funded by Seattle Department of Transportation 1% for Art funds and administered by the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs.
 
Leo Berk to create artwork for Highland Park
 
 
Leo Berk, Threshold, 2009, salvaged timbers, epoxy, urethane and cork, 18' x 24' x 44'. Located at the Rollin Street Flats condominium building in Seattle, Wash. Photo by Mark Woods.
 
Seattle artist Leo Berk will create a permanent, site-specific artwork design for Highland Park in Seattle's Highland Park neighborhood. The artwork will be part of Seattle Parks and Recreation's (Parks) Highland Spray Park Improvement Project.

Highland Park is identified in the Parks and Green Spaces Levy and provides for the renovation and conversion of the existing wading pool into a spray park. This renovation project will allow for full water re-circulating systems for the spray park, provide for a better play experience for children, and conserve water. Berk will work with Parks staff to develop and fabricate an artwork near the spray park, scheduled to be completed in spring 2013.

Berk has been included in solo and group exhibitions locally and internationally. He is the recipient of numerous grants and awards, including the 2010 Arts Innovator Award by Artist Trust. His work is in the collections of the city of Seattle and the Tacoma Art Museum.  Berk has received numerous private and public commissions including by Seattle Sound Transit, King County, the city of Shoreline, Vulcan Inc. and the University of Washington.

Berk was selected from a prequalified artist roster by a panel that included an artist, a community representative from Highland Park Action Committee and Parks staff. The artwork is funded by the 2008 Parks and Green Spaces Levy 1% for Art funds.
 
Celeste Cooning to create artwork for Jackson Park trail
 
 
Celeste Cooning, Celebration and Fanfare, 2010, cut paper installation, 30' x 45' x 60'. Located at Occidental Square in the Pioneer Square neighborhood of Seattle as part of the ARTSparks program—a collaboration between Seattle Parks and Recreation, the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs and 4Culture. Photo courtesy of Andrea Giaier.
 
Seattle artist Celeste Cooning will create a permanent, site-specific artwork design for the Jackson Park Golf Course and Trail in Northeast Seattle. The artwork is part of Seattle Parks and Recreation’s (Parks) Jackson Park Golf Course Project and will make an impact along the trail or at its main entrances.

Friends of Jackson Park Trail and Parks have developed a master plan for a new perimeter trail around the Jackson Park Golf Course. The approximately 2.2-mile-long trail will be a mix of existing sidewalks and wooded trails. The trail will remain separate from the golf course. There will be areas where trail and golf cart paths intervene, but both pedestrians and golf carts will each have designated areas on the path. The artwork is scheduled to be complete spring 2013.

Cooning studied figurative painting and art history at Indiana University, Bloomington. The MFA painting program at the University of Washington brought her to Seattle, where she currently lives and works. A pervading interest in pattern and ornament led to the exploration of cut paper. Her studio practice encompasses small works and site-specific installations for both interior and exterior spaces.

Cooning was selected from a prequalified artist roster by a panel that included an artist, a community representative from Friends of Jackson Park Trail and Parks staff. The artwork is funded by Parks 1% for Art funds.
 
Brazilian, Motown, indie and alt-country music on City Hall plaza this month
 
 
Bobby Medina & The Red Hot Band will bring some sizzle to City Hall, noon, Thursday, Aug. 9.
 
Free summer concerts heat up City Hall's outdoor plaza from noon to 1:30 p.m. every Thursday in August. Catch the concerts before they're over! Seattle Presents' lunchtime summer concert series for 2012 ends this month.

Starting off the month on Aug. 2, the uplifting and infectious Sambatuque brings to Seattle a vibrant and eclectic blend of music from Brazil and the Caribbean. To keep the energy going, on Aug. 9 Bobby Medina & The Red Hot Band will sizzle with a performance jam-packed with the greatest hits of our time—from jazz to Motown to rock, disco and Zydeco.

Catch indie singer-songwriter Kris Orlowski on Aug. 15, followed by the indie rock and funk jams of Jon Solo on Aug. 23. Acoustic duo Kasey Anderson and special guest Star Anna close out the season on Aug. 30 with the perfect soundtrack for a late-summer afternoon.

In case of rain, most concerts will be held in City Hall's lobby.

The shows are presented by the Seattle Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs in partnership with Seattle Parks and Recreation, Metropolitan Improvement District and Triamp Group.
 
Public art program involves summer intern in conservation work
 
 
Daniel Schwartz
 
Daniel Schwartz, a fourth year art history student at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C., has returned for a second summer as the conservation and maintenance intern on the public art team.

Last year Daniel was a part of the conservation team responsible for restoration of the Seattle Totem Pole at Pioneer Place Park and several other projects. Invigorated by the work he did last year, Daniel will head to graduate school in the near future to pursue a degree in conservation and material science. He has worked as a volunteer in the conservation lab at the Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver's world heritage museum. He enjoys playing sports and watching the Seattle Mariners, listening and playing music, enjoying the great food Seattle has to offer, and taking advantage of the numerous city and state parks that surround our great city.
 
Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs
City of Seattle
arts.culture@seattle.gov
(206) 684-7171
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