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In this Issue — April 2012

 Message from the director: Celebrating 50 years of arts in Seattle
and The Next Fifty
 Seeking artists to create temporary artworks for sidewalks, parks
 Seeking artist to create artwork for Rainier Beach's Mapes Creek
 New cultural facilities funding program opens in May
 Temporary artworks at Seattle Center's The Next Fifty celebration
 Artwork to light up King Street Station plaza, opens April 20
 Save the date for cultural space event, May 3
 Free workshop on hidden hazards in the arts, May 11
 City exhibition features artists working with recycled materials
 Nominations for 2012 Mayor's Arts Awards due April 17
 Artist sought for Seattle Design Commission
 Get Engaged program seeks youth for city boards and commissions
 Film documents issues facing LGBT elderly, screening April 19
 Animation, Americana and more on Art Zone



Call: Temporary artworks for city sidewalks, parks
Deadline: May 4
Call: Mapes Creek project
Deadline: May 18
Other:
Calls for Artists
Jobs
Funding
Training

Seattle Arts Commission Meeting

Seattlight opening at King Street Station

Artist Panel at The Next Fifty Earth Day Celebration

Cultural Space Seattle brown bag session


City Hall Lobby and Anne Focke galleries:
Looking into Light
March 6 through April 27
Seattle Municipal Tower:
Reclaimed: Artists Working with Recycled or Repurposed Materials
Through June 1
Washington Trade Center:
Enduring Clay
Through April 9
 
Image: Adam Frank's CURRENT is a living map of Seattle's hydro-electric generation and electricity use. One of six temporary artworks and performances that celebrate The Next Fifty,
the 50th anniversary of the 1962 World's Fair at Seattle Center. Photo by the artist.
Message from the director: Celebrating 50 years of arts in Seattle and The Next Fifty
 
 

 
The 1962 World's Fair put Seattle on the map, and this year Seattle Center celebrates the fair's 50th anniversary with The Next Fifty. Six months of artworks, events and activities at the Center April 21 through Oct. 21 will mark the legacy the fair left to the region and the opportunities that lie ahead. For the celebration's "Sustainable Futures Month," we're presenting six temporary artworks and performances that illustrate how contemporary artists are shaping the conversation around environmental sustainability.

Before the World's Fair, when people thought of Seattle it was as a point of entry to the 19th-century gold rush. The fair branded Seattle as a timely place celebrating science and technology and opening the door to the future. Dusting off the ways of the Old West, the fair took on a space-age name: Century 21 Exposition.

In 1962, nearly 10 million people enjoyed a broad range of attractions, including more than 2,500 performing arts events with acts from around the world. The futuristically themed fair gave the city a 74-acre park devoted to history, science, arts and culture, and the Space Age. It also gave us the Seattle Repertory Theatre, the cultural fundraising organization Poncho, and the Horiuchi Mural, all celebrating 50th anniversaries this year. It gave us Seattle Opera and its home McCaw Hall (Mercer Arts Arena in 1962), KeyArena (formerly the Washington State Pavilion), the Intiman Theatre (then the World's Fair Playhouse), and a "modern art pavilion" for the Seattle Art Museum.

The fair led us to cultural festivals, the Seattle Shakespeare Company, Seattle Children's Theatre, the Experience Music Project, Bumbershoot, the Northwest Folklife Festival and Pacific Northwest Ballet and so much more!

The cultural legacy the fair left to the city was profound. Today, Seattle's creative vitality is nearly three times the national average—among the highest in the nation—according to the recent Creative Vitality Index released by the Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF). The measure is based on arts participation and employment. Nonprofit arts and arts-active organizations in Seattle earned $415 million in revenue in 2010. Ticket sales at Seattle's live performing arts venues generated $193 million in revenues. That's $235.17 per capita—nearly four-and-a-half times the national average.

Despite a down economy, we are a region of arts consumers. Overall participation in arts and culture activities in King County is 71 percent higher than the national average, according to a recent Local Arts Index report released by Americans for the Arts. County nonprofit arts organizations inject $254 per capita into the local economy compared to a national average of $58 per capita. And nonprofit arts revenues in King County are 248 percent higher than the national average.

And here's more good news. We're pleased to report that the governor signed Senate Bill 6574 last week, protecting up to $900,000 in estimated admission tax revenue to the city. The Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs receives 75 percent of admission tax revenues, which support our funding programs for Seattle's arts and cultural organizations and artists.

Here's to the future!

Sincerely,

Vincent E. Kitch
Director
 
Seeking artists to create temporary artworks for sidewalks, parks
 
 
Suzanne Tidwell, Artificial Light, large-scale knitting (acrylic yarn), 2011. Located at Occidental Park as part of ArtSparks 2011. Photo by Suzanne Tidwell.
 
We're seeking artists to create temporary art installations along Greenwood Avenue North and the Central Waterfront for the project Art Interruptions. Art Interruptions encourages artists to install artworks on city sidewalks and parks and offer passers-by a brief interruption in their day with a moment of surprise, beauty or humor. Possible locations for artworks include street and park infrastructure and furniture (utility poles, trees, tree pits, walls, railings, stair risers, etc.). Up to 12 artists will be selected to develop artworks to be displayed for six weeks this summer.

Possible sidewalk and park locations include Greenwood Avenue North between North 65th and North 87th streets, Waterfront Park, Piers 62 and 63, and Pike Street Hill Climb between Alaskan Way and Western Avenue.

The call is open to artists residing in Washington state. Each selected artist will receive a $1,000 stipend. Application deadline is 11 p.m., Friday, May 4. Click here to apply.

The artwork project is in partnership with Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) and Seattle Parks and Recreation. The artwork is funded by SDOT 1% for Art funds and administered by the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs.
 
Seeking artist to create artwork for Rainier Beach's Mapes Creek
 
 
Lorna Jordan, Salmon Bone Bridge, 2002. Located on the Longfellow Creek Trail near Southwest Genessee Street, west of 26th Avenue Southwest. Photo by the artist.
 
We're seeking an artist or artist team to develop site-integrated artwork for Seattle Public Utilities' (SPU) Lower Mapes Creek Restoration Project in the Rainier Beach neighborhood.

SPU is restoring lower Mapes Creek and creating an open-stream channel in Beer Sheva Park to improve habitat for juvenile Chinook salmon in Lake Washington. The project area includes 52nd Avenue South, between Rainier Avenue South and South Henderson Street, and into the park.

The creek restoration is currently in design through early 2013 and construction is expected to begin in mid 2013. Project completion is expected in 2015. The artist or artist team will work with SPU and consultants to develop the artwork within the schedule of the restoration.

The call is open to professional artists residing in the United States. Application deadline is 11 p.m., Friday, May 18 (Pacific Daylight Time). The total budget for the artwork is $200,000, all-inclusive of fabrication, installation, travel, taxes and other project costs. Click here to apply.

The artwork project is in partnership with SPU and Seattle Department of Parks and Recreation. The artwork is funded by SPU 1% for Art funds and administered by the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs.
 
New cultural facilities funding program opens in May
 
 
 
Mark your calendars. The Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs' new Cultural Facilities Program will award one-time funding to Seattle arts, heritage, cultural and arts-service organizations for urgent-need capital projects including emergency facility renovations or the final-phase completion of new facilities. Applications will be available by mid-May. Application deadline is Wednesday, June 20.

Eligible organizations must have at least a three-year operating history as a legally established not-for-profit organization, have control of the facility through ownership or a longer-term lease, and demonstrate a record of ongoing artistic or cultural accomplishments in Seattle. Projects must be able to take place and be completed between September 2012 and December 2013.
 
Temporary artworks at Seattle Center's The Next Fifty celebration
 
 
Stokley Towles. Photo by John J. Little, Sr.
 
From a living sculpture designed to manage stormwater runoff to a giant squid bike rack, we present six temporary artworks and performances that illustrate how artists are shaping the conversation around environmental sustainability. The artworks help celebrate The Next Fifty, the 50th anniversary of the 1962 World's Fair, at Seattle Center, April 21 to Oct. 21. Go here for specific locations and dates.

Adam Frank's CURRENT is a real-time map of Seattle's hydroelectric generation and energy use projected onto the north wall in Seattle Center's Center House. Mandy Greer will create the 250-foot crocheted artwork Mater Matrix Mother and Medium. The artwork, in a full spectrum of blues, will be attached to trees and columns, creating a "river" that sits seven to 15 feet off the ground.

Stacy Levy's Straw Garden: from Wattle to Watershed will be composed of wattles—tightly wrapped straw and coir cylinders and mats that aid in re-vegetation and erosion control on hillsides—arranged in configurations that resemble Baroque garden formations. The sculpture will morph into naturalistic patterns that resemble water as it moves across the landscape. Parking Squid, by artist Susan Robb, provides parking for eight or more bicycles within the tentacles of a deep-sea creature.

Beginning in May, uncover the world of urban rainfall and trace its travels from the clouds to the sewer lines in Stokley Towles' witty and insightful one-man performance Stormwater: Life in the Gutter. Towles will perform the nearly one-hour piece eight times throughout the month. Also in May, five filmmakers tap into the flow of water and invite viewers to reflect on the preservation of our water resources in the series of short films Water Calling.

Frank, Greer and Levy will discuss their artworks in a panel discussion, 2 to 3:30 p.m., Sunday, April 22, at Seattle Center's Center House as part of The Next Fifty's Earth Day Celebration. Julie Parrett, landscape architect, Seattle Design Commissioner and member of the Seattle Arts Commission's Public Art Advisory Committee, will moderate the panel.

The artworks are presented in partnership with Seattle Public Utilities, Seattle City Light and Seattle Department of Transportation.
 
Artwork to light up King Street Station plaza, opens April 20
 
 
Rebar, Seattlight concept illustration.
 
The San Francisco artist group Rebar will unveil their temporary installation Seattlight at King Street Station's newly refurbished Jackson Plaza, 8 to 9 p.m., Friday, April 20. Stop by the station at 303 South Jackson St. and meet the artists as they light up the plaza.

Seattlight is a nighttime, interactive art piece designed to highlight the unseen pathways of pedestrian traffic through the plaza. The artwork lights up in response to the movements of people as they walk past and through the space.

The artwork was commissioned to celebrate the new public plaza created as part of the King Street Station restoration. The artwork will remain on view throughout 2012.

Seattlight was funded by Seattle Department of Transportation 1% for Art funds and administered by the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs.
 
Save the date for cultural space event, May 3
 
 
Dancers from the Pat Graney Company. Photo by Tim Summers.
 
Get an update on the city's arts and cultural space development initiatives at a brown-bag session, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Thursday, May 3. The Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs and the Seattle Arts Commission present this free, public event at City Hall's Bertha Knight Landes Room, 601 Fifth Ave.

Hear findings and recommendations from last December's two-day event Cultural Space Seattle, which focused on shaping policies to keep and create affordable space for artists and arts organizations in Seattle. Artists, government leaders, arts administrators, investors, real estate developers and brokers, and interested citizens participated in workshops working towards a plan to advance an agenda for cultural space initiatives.

And get updates on the Artist Space Assistance Program, a pilot program coordinated by Shunpike to provide relocation and placement services for artists and arts organizations; Storefronts Seattle, a program for artists to create artwork for vacant storefronts; Square Feet Seattle, a guide to acquiring cultural space; and the Office's new Cultural Facilities Program one-time funding for renovations and repairs of arts and cultural facilities.
 
Free workshop on hidden hazards in the arts, May 11
 
 
John Armstrong, Signs, Signs (detail), 2005, digital print.
 
Art is fun! But it can also be dangerous. Learn about potential risks at a free workshop, Hidden Hazards in the Arts, noon to 3 p.m., Friday, May 11, at The Seattle Public Library, Central Branch, 4th floor, Room 2.

Learn about harmful chemicals, including toxic solvents and heavy metals, found in many art disciplines. Get an overview of toxicology and learn preventative steps to keep chemicals out of your body. Find out how to dispose of hazardous art supplies safely and inexpensively. Dave Waddell, Art Chemical Hazards Project coordinator with the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program in King County, will lead the workshop.

The workshop will include a Q&A session. Light refreshments will be provided.

The workshop is free and open to the public, but space is limited. To attend, RSVP to Tiffany Hedrick, public art conservation technician, (206) 615-1879.
 
City exhibition features artists working with recycled materials
 
 
Marita Dingus, Quilt (detail), 2000, recycled fabrics, 62" x 36". Photo courtesy of the artist.
 
Ever wonder what happens to old pull tabs from aluminum cans, the wire off champagne corks, or that old lathe from a room remodel? Well, wonder no more. You'll find these and many other objects reclaimed by several artists and put to good use in the exhibition Reclaimed: Artists Working with Recycled or Repurposed Materials. The exhibition is on view through June 1 at Seattle Municipal Tower Gallery.

Reclaimed highlights 16 artworks by 10 artists, including Lawrence Beck, Ross Palmer Beecher, Evan Blackwell, Diem Chau, Marita Dingus, Julia Haack, Meng Huang, Kate Hunt, Deborah Lawrence and Marie Watt.

In Tracks 2 (2009), Haack salvaged the lathe from old houses being torn down and reworked the rough-hewn wood into brightly painted, dimensional wall pieces. Beecher gathered tin cans and bottle caps and cut and wove the tossed debris into motifs in Candy Cobweb Quilt (2003). In The Disposable Heroes series (2005), Blackwell used thrown-away materials such as plastic forks or those iconic, red plastic cups and melted them to form life-sized heads.

City Curator and Collections Manager Deborah Paine selected the artworks from the city's Portable Works Collection. Nine of the artworks were recently purchased by the Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) Solid Waste Division using SPU 1% for Art funds.
 
Nominations for 2012 Mayor's Arts Awards due April 17
 
 

 
Know an individual or organization making a difference in Seattle through arts and culture? Nominate them for a 2012 Mayor's Arts Award. The nomination deadline is 5 p.m., Tuesday, April 17.

This year we will celebrate the 10th annual Mayor's Arts Awards. The awards recognize the accomplishments of artists, arts and cultural organizations and community members committed to enriching their communities through the arts.

The Seattle Arts Commission will review public nominations and recommend recipients to Mayor McGinn for final selection. The mayor will honor the recipients at a public ceremony at Seattle Center, noon, Friday, Aug. 31. He will also open the Bumbershoot Visual Arts Exhibits for a free public preview that day.

The awards are presented in partnership with Bumbershoot®: Seattle's Music & Arts Festival and media sponsor City Arts magazine.

Go here for a list of previous recipients of the Mayor's Arts Award.
 
Artist sought for Seattle Design Commission
 
 
Yesler Community Center, a 2004 Seattle Design Commission project. Photo by Juan Hernandez and Mithun.
 
Mayor Mike McGinn is looking for an artist to serve on the Seattle Design Commission. The artist will provide advice on plans for new public projects such as fire stations, parks and streetscapes, and on major projects affecting the city including the waterfront and light rail stations. The artist will also serve as the Design Commission's liaison to the Seattle Arts Commission's Public Art Advisory Committee.

The 10-member Design Commission includes architects, urban designers, environmental designers, urban planners, landscape architects, engineers, an artist, a member-at-large and one member from Get Engaged, the YMCA Young Civic Leaders program. For more information on the Design Commission, go here.

A letter of interest and resume is due April 9. Go here for information on how to apply. Contact Valerie Kinast with questions, (206) 233-7911.
 
Get Engaged program seeks youth for city boards and commissions
 
 
 
Get Engaged, the YMCA Young Civic Leaders program, is recruiting 15 young people aged 18 to 29 to serve for one year on Seattle's public boards and commissions. Commissioners help shape policy decisions, make recommendations and provide citizen participation in city government. The 15 boards range in interest areas—from design to human rights—and include a position with the Seattle Arts Commission.

In addition to serving on a public board, participants meet monthly as a cohort for leadership competency training, issue discussions and other activities.

Application deadline is May 14. For more information and to apply, go here. Contact Roni Ayalla with question at (206) 250-2456.
 
Film documents issues facing LGBT elderly, screening April 19
 
 

 
View a free, public screening of the documentary Ten More Good Years, noon to 2 p.m., Thursday, April 19 at Seattle City Hall's Bertha Knight Landes room. The 71-minute film focuses on issues facing the elder lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender (LGBT) population, including tax laws, Medicaid and Medicare regulations, Social Security and inheritance laws, and the need for non-discriminatory housing.

A panel discussion with a Q&A will follow the screening. Panelists are Michael Jacoby, director of Ten More Good Years; Mac MacGregor, Seattle LGBT commissioner; Louise Chernin, Greater Seattle Business Association chair; and Brad Hoover, social worker with Seattle Human Services Department and former LGBT commissioner.

Meet film director Jacoby at a no-host, cocktail social at 8 p.m., April 19, at The Lobby Bar, 916 East Pike St. Or attend a special screening and meet the director, 7 p.m., Saturday, April 21 at The Lobby Bar.

Sponsors of the film and panel discussion are Seattle City Councilmembers Sally Bagshaw, Sally Clark, Mike O'Brien and Tom Rasmussen; Seattle Office for Civil Rights; SEqual Seattle LGBTQ Employees for Equality; Seattle LGBT Commission; Seattle Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs; The Lobby Bar; and LookOut Films.
 
Animation, Americana and more on Art Zone
 
 

 
Animation and Americana music. Tibetan photos and films by youth. Spring into the local arts scene this month on Seattle Channel's Art Zone with Nancy Guppy.

On April 6, see new animation from Dale Goodson. Hear music by Damien Jurado. And visit the beautifully renovated Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center.

On April 13, watch a profile on music photographer Lance Mercer. Preview the upcoming National Film Festival for Talented Youth. And Carrie Clark and the Lonesome Lovers visit the Art Zone studio.

On April 27, photographer and filmmaker Phil Borges shares his book of Tibetan photos. Visit the vibrant world of artist No Touching Ground. And hear new music from Americana band Hale May.

Art Zone with Nancy Guppy airs on Seattle Channel at 8 p.m., Fridays, and on KCTS Channel 9 at 11 p.m., Fridays and Sundays. You can also watch Art Zone on the web. Art Zone will not air on April 20.
 
Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs
City of Seattle
arts.culture@seattle.gov
(206) 684-7171
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