"Sophia and the Animals," 2014, Cappy Thompson, Vitreous enamel reverse painted on glass
"Sophia and the Animals," 2014, Cappy Thompson, Vitreous enamel reverse painted on glass

Creature Feature: Animal Art

Seattle Municipal Tower Gallery

Creature Feature: Animal Art

April 6 - June 29, 2018

How long have artists been making art about animals? Over 40,000 years! There is nothing in the city's collection that far back, but we do have a variety of artworks that include various creatures both real and imagined. Creature Feature: Animal Art includes 23 artworks by 22 artists in a range of mediums, from tiny prints to large sculptures.

Many of the animals found in Creature Feature are based in reality but a few artists reference mythology or create something new. Cappy Thompson's painting on glass, Sophia and the Animals, depicts a woman surrounded by animals, a few of which don't exist in nature. Owl Woman by Caroline Orr references stories passed down by her Native American ancestors via her grandparents. Dean Wong captures a child's wonder at dragon's heads lined up on the sidewalk in his photograph from 1993, Michael #11. There are even some Martians created by Susan Nininger and documented in photographs by Sharon Beals and William Murray. Back on Earth, Grace Weston creates and photographs humorous scenes, as in her Plume vs. Plume depicting birds watching an atomic blast. Clair Colquitt's Turista Radio combines kitsch, West Coast funk, parrots and National Public Radio in a bright ceramic package. Man's best friend, in this case Harold Hoy's Erector Yorkshire, is made completely out of galvanized steel tape and screws.  Speaking of dogs, they are well represented from William Johnson's abstracted drawing, Untitled (Running Dog) to Sherry Markovitz's more realistic painting, One Black, One White to Cheryl Comstock's two fantastical pieces, April Fools I & II, which include not only canines but cats, birds, humans and even a few bugs. Northwest fauna is represented in Jimmy Jet's City Suite lithograph in the form of an Orca, Tom Askman's charcoal drawing of a bivalve in Clam Destiny/Clam Chowder and we get slugs and salmon, loved and loathed respectively, in Patrick Anderson's linocut, Geography of Washington State, Vol. 2. From 16 birds to 2 turtles and all the creatures in between, I hope you enjoy this show curated from the Portable Works collection.

Blake Haygood
Curator and Collections Manager

Artists in the show: Patrick Anderson, Cheryl dos Remedios, Harold Hoy, Clair Colquitt, Jeffry Mitchell, Sheila Sieb, Blair Wilson, Jimmy Jet, Grace Weston, Dean Wong, William Murray, Sharon Beals, Roger Schreiber, Cheryl Comstock, Sherry Markovitz, Shelley Moore, Caroline Orr, Cappy Thompson, Kay Buckner, Tom Askman, Warner Blake, William Johnson

Location

Level 3 Concourse
Seattle Municipal Tower
700 Fifth Ave.
Seattle, WA 98104
Get Directions

Gallery Hours

Monday - Friday
7 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Blake Haygood
Curator and Collections Manager
(206) 684-7132
blake.haygood@seattle.gov

Subject Matter: People in Photographs
January 4 – April 4, 2018
A small survey of photographs featuring people from the City’s Portable Works Collection.
Your Body of Water, Part II
April 5 – July 3, 2017
"Your Body of Water," Seattle Public Utilities’ (SPU) newest additions to their portable works collection, are a visual exploration of our connections to water and how it is protected and cared for by SPU.
Your Body of Water, Part I
January 11 – April 4, 2017
The Seattle Municipal Tower Gallery now features Your Body of Water Part I, an exhibition drawn from a recent purchase of 33 artworks by 31 artists from the Pacific Northwest for the Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) portable works collection. The exhibition aims to visually explore our connections to water and how it is protected and cared for by SPU.
Cultural Perspectives, Part III
October 4 – December 28, 2016
The focus of the purchase was to select artworks that represent experiences and social concerns of and from communities of color.
Cultural Perspectives Part 1 & 2
April 7 - September 30, 2016
Featuring 66 recently purchased artworks from 45 artists by Seattle Public Utilities.
Seattle Simplified
October 1, 2015 - April 3, 2016
Two part exhibition encompasses Seattle City Light’s recent artwork purchases which portray Seattle and its surrounding landscape.
Recent Acquisitions of Native American Art for Seattle Public Utilities Portable Artwork Collection
July 1 - September 29, 2015
Highlighting 25 works from Native American artists acquired for Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) Portable Artworks Collection.
Play
April 2 - June 30, 2015
Features a number of works that inspire and delight visitors with images featuring play and recreation.

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Galleries

Current Shows in our Galleries

Someday We'll All Be Free
March 2 - May 1, 2018
The paintings and photos in this exhibit give voice to youth in our communities who want to have a public dialog about mass incarceration and abolition. Their creativity seeks answers to the questions: How can we create a society healthy enough that we do not need prisons? What does it mean to be free?
Danie Allinice
July 12 - October 16, 2017
The Ethnic Heritage Art Gallery features artwork by Danie Allinice.
yəhaw'
Winter 2018 The Seattle Office of Arts & Culture is opening a new arts and cultural hub on the third floor of King Street Station and the inaugural exhibition will be yəhaw'.
Dialogues in Art: Exhibitions on Homelessness
Thru December 14, 2017
A four-exhibition series in which artists and artist teams develop artistic projects on the topic of homelessness. Each two-month exhibition in the city’s Seattle Presents Gallery will demonstrate artists thinking expansively about what shelter and stability mean to diverse populations, and examining the systemic causes of homelessness
Creature Feature: Animal Art
April 6 – June 29, 2018
A small survey of artworks that include various creatures both real and imagined from the City’s Portable Works Collection.

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