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Mercer West Dexter to 5th Avenue W
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Mercer Corridor Project: Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Does SDOT watch traffic flow throughout the corridor and make changes to light timing?

    SDOT signal engineers continue to monitor traffic flow through field observations and by watching SDOT’s traffic cameras from the SDOT Traffic Management Center. East/west traffic flow through the corridor is given priority due to the high volumes of drivers traveling to and from I-5. However, SDOT balances the needs of all travelers, including those traveling north and south through the corridor.

  2. Why did SDOT decide to convert the corridor to two-way traffic?

    One of the main reasons to convert Mercer St. into a two-way street was to assist westbound traffic flow and provide a more direct route for travelers from I-5 to the Queen Anne, Magnolia, and Ballard neighborhoods. Additionally, the project helped remove some of the existing conflicts between traffic and pedestrians caused by the one-way street configuration (e.g., at Roy St. and Queen Anne Ave. N).

    Queen Anne Ave. N was converted into a two-way street between Roy and Mercer streets so that drivers could use a more direct route via the main arterials (Mercer St. and Queen Anne Ave. N) to access north Queen Anne.

    Please note that travel times were just one of the reasons to make the change to a two-way Mercer. Eliminating the westbound weave from I-5 over to Valley St. makes travel more intuitive and traffic flow into the city more directly. The project will also make the corridor far friendlier for pedestrians and cyclists, both of whom have increased substantially in recent years.

  3. The right turn from westbound Roy St. to northbound Queen Anne Ave. N is confusing. Can you help explain the workings of this intersection?

    Traffic turning right from Roy St. to Queen Anne Ave. N must stop for pedestrians crossing Queen Anne Ave. N in the new crosswalk.

    When westbound Roy St. has a green arrow, the intersection is designed such that traffic can travel directly through the intersection to northbound Queen Anne Ave. N or across Roy St. without having to stop in the middle of the intersection.  

    It is legal to turn right from westbound Roy St. to northbound Queen Anne Ave. N after stopping at a red arrow if there is no conflicting pedestrian or vehicular traffic and if the No Right Turn sign next to the signal is not lit.  The No Right Turn sign is lit when pedestrians have the green light to walk across Queen Anne Ave. N.

  4. Why did SDOT decide to close Broad St.?

    The Mercer Corridor Project permanently closed Broad St. permanently on June 1, 2014.  This closure was necessary to complete construction of the Mercer Corridor Improvements including widening Mercer St. Additionally, this closure allows WSDOT to construct the SR 99 highway connection from the bored tunnel portal at Harrison Street to the south end of the new SR 99 bridge over Mercer Street.

  5. When did Mercer Corridor Project construction begin and when will it be complete?

    Construction east of Dexter Ave. N began in 2010 with the demolition of eight buildings north of Mercer St. Mercer West construction began in spring 2013. Construction east of Dexter Ave. N was completed in March 2014 and Mercer West construction is anticipated to be complete in mid-2015.

  6. What changes have taken place at the intersection of Taylor Ave. N and Mercer St.?

    There is a temporary signal at the intersection of Taylor Ave. N and Mercer St. that facilitates left turns from Taylor Ave. N onto eastbound Mercer St. Travelers are also able to turn right onto Taylor Ave. N from westbound Mercer St., although left turns onto Taylor Ave. N from eastbound Mercer St. are no longer available. Access to and from Mercer St. via Taylor Ave. N may be restricted during construction due to nearby utility work and the crosswalk across Taylor Ave. N at Mercer St. is currently closed.

 

 

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